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Tutorial: RealSystem G2 and SMIL

By Scott Clark Part 6 -- The SMIL File So now we've created our RealPix file, and we've encoded our audio file or files, and we're ready to create the actual SMIL file which puts it all together. If you haven't downloaded the RealSystem SMIL Wizard Preview, do so now. The SMIL wizard cuts a lot of the work out for you, although you may have to tailer the file to further suit your own application. Included with the SMIL Wizard are 11 SMIL templates, including:
  • Audio Mix
  • Classified
  • Closed Caption
  • Headline News
  • Image Collage
  • Karaoke
  • Real Flash
  • Slideshow
  • Song Lyrics
  • Station Identification
  • Talking Banner
Even if you can't find a suitable template to use, you can still find one that closely resembles the layout you're looking for. This will save you the hassle of creating the SMIL file from scratch, and will show you how to properly use the files you've created. The SMIL Wizard guides you through the creation of the SMIL file, and allows you to choose which files you wish to have included. When you are finished with the procedure, you'll have a SMIL file which you can use to finish up your presentation. Below is the completed SMIL file for the RainForestRiff presentation:
 <smil> <head> <meta name="title" content="The Forest" /> <meta name="author" content="scott@internet.com" /> <meta name="copyright" content="©1998" /> <layout type="text/smil-basic-layout"> <region id="RealPixChannel1" title="RealPixChannel1" left="0" top="0" height="192" width="256" background-color="#888888" fit="hidden"/> </layout> </head> <body> <par title="multiplexor"> <img src="forest.rp" id="Top Left Image Stream" region="RealPixChannel1" title="Top Left Image Stream"/> <audio src="intro.rm" begin="2.0s" id="introSoundtrack" title="introSoundtrack" alt="Intro Riff"/> <audio src="bluesriff.rm" begin="8.0s" id="Soundtrack" title="Soundtrack" alt="Background Riff"/> </par> </body> </smil> 
You can see that the head section, like the RealPix file, contains information such as title, author and copyright. It also tells the G2 Player where to display the RealPix data (in the layout section of the header). Much like an HTML page, the body section is where the real "meat" of the presentation lies. Unlike HTML, however, all SMIL and RealPix tags are in lower case. To play a sequence of files, you would use the <seq> tag, however, we are playing files simultaneously, so we'll be using the <par> tag. SMIL tags have both beginning and endings (<par> and </par>), unlike RealPix tags.


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