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Microsoft's Liquid Motion, Part 3

By Scott Clark Full-featured multimedia banners and buttons for all! Unlike standard animations, Liquid Motion animations can respond to user events, such as mouse press or release, moving the mouse over the area, leaving the area, etc. Timing events, such as when the response occurs in conjunction with the user event, how long it occurs, etc. may also be controlled from within the object properties (again available from the toolbar or menu). These can be called using JavaScript or the native API, with the limitations that each method entails. Specific URLs can be linked from areas or objects within the animation as well, providing extensive control for the developer of the animation. The result of all these features is a package that will enable even non-programmers or non-graphics professionals to create sharp, effective animations for use on the Web. While the proprietary aspects of Liquid Motion will leave some users out, it does cover most of the bases by using browser detection and displaying the most appropriate version of the animation. All in all, this release shows that animation tools are starting to improve to the point where you won't cringe when we see yet another animated gif on a Web page. This article first appeared in July of 1998


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