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OmniPage Web (Part 3)

By David Fiedler Taking Steps Zoning a page is done even before OmniPage Web actually tries to read the text. It attempts to draw a map showing which parts of a page are straight text, which are graphics, tables, reverse text, multiple columns, etc. If it gets any of this wrong, you can simply right-click on a zone and convince it otherwise. Accurate zoning is important for recognition in the next step, as well as page layout later on. OCR can be either a breeze or a major pain. Caere has one of the best engines in the business, but remember that even 99% accuracy means that in a short 2,000 word document (with 10,000 characters or so) you might end up with 100 errors! In practice, well-printed typeset documents in good condition should require little "hand work"...it's when you're doing a product review with all kinds of strange input that you can expect trouble! Once OCR is completed, anything that hasn't been recognized as a word is brought up as a spelling check...you can make changes or add specialized vocabulary words to your own dictionary. Unfortunately, if OmniPage Web thinks it read something correctly, it won't necessarily ask you about it, which is apparently how my name got turned into David Flodis without my permission (coming up later!). Once that's done, the next step is outlining. Here's basically where you can adjust the portions of your document for relative importance, and it's set up just like an outline processor in Word, so you can easily change things from Heading 1 to Heading 2, or body text, or a page header/footer. The final step is just a click and your decision on what to name the file, and then it's launched in your browser. [Move on to the next part of the article]


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