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OmniPage Web (Part 4)

OK, it really does work. See this link (all these demo links will open in new windows) for a "straight" HTML version of a nine-page document that was completely recognized and coded by OmniPage Web (GIF versions of the original TIFF images of the scanned pages supplied by Caere, as well as the other documents I scanned in myself, are available here). Notice the way the email and Web addresses on the first page have been automatically picked up and properly coded, not to mention the table on page 5! While the original document was on nine pages, OmniPage Web works with the logical structure, so it created new pages only wherever it felt a "level 1 heading" had been encountered (this, like almost everything else, is easily configurable). Even more important, it recognizes things like "Section 4.5" in the text, and will generate internal links to that part of the document! When all the logic is done, it's simple for OmniPage Web to generate a table of contents and frames, so it does that by default. But wait, there's more! Click here and you'll see what looks like a completely different document...but it was created from the same original scans, and the only change was simply selecting one of OmniPage Web's 20 predefined styles (of course, you can modify these or create your own from scratch and save them for future use). Cascading style sheets are even supported, and you can guess that XML will be coming next. And reading the HTML that OmniPage Web creates won't give you the kind of headache that Microsoft FrontPage 98 might.

...and Some Reality

If you're expecting to take catalog or manual pages and have them show up on the Web exactly as originally designed, you might be in for a bit of a disappointment. This link takes you to a manual page that was scanned in line mode (pure black and white) before being converted to HTML, and here's the same page after being scanned in grayscale (again, click here to see the original pages). This really came out pretty well, because it was typeset, but it illustrates how even simple designs get changed around a bit. Fortunately, it's easy to edit the HTML if you want to finesse the final product.


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