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Learning How to Code SVG:Scalable Vector Graphics

by Kas Thomas Scalable Vector Graphics will let you draw graphics using inline code...and it's efficient! Last week we got a quick glimpse at some of the power and promise contained in the World Wide Web Consortium's latest XML-derived webdoc standard, the soon-to-go-primetime SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics). We noted that contrary to what the name implies, SVG is not merely a graphics engine but rather a fully CSS-compliant, Unicode-ready document standard with all the power of XML, Cascading Style Sheets, and stroked/filled vector graphics contained in one flexible, easy-to-use XML tagset. Plus, like any good markup language these days, SVG adheres to the Document Object Model, which means every element inside an SVG doc is reachable from JavaScript. This, in turn, opens the door to scriptable animation, while also putting a moveto( )/lineto( ) graphics engine at the disposal of JavaScript programmers.This week I want to show you what real, working SVG code looks like, and at the same time, make good on my earlier promise that you don't need anybody's fancy SVG authoring software to create SVG docs, because in actuality, any ordinary text editor will do. Without further fuss, let's take a look inside a small (yet fully functional) SVG file designed to produce a graphic similar to the one shown below:The complete code for this image looks like this:


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