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Get Ready for the Awesome Power of SVG:Scalable Vector Graphics

by Kas Thomas Scalable Vector Graphics represents a collaborative effort by some of the biggest players in the computer world to find a workable cross-platform solution to Web imaging. And it's XML-ready! HTML, invented in the paleolithic predawn of ARPAnet, when computer users marveled at green phosphors flickering on dumb terminals, was an advanced technology for its day. But hardly anyone considers it the e-doc format of the future. Whatever its other virtues, HTML's failings in areas like extensibility, metastructure, and graphics have become too painful to ignore. Something much better will be needed to carry the Web forward into the 21st century. And fortunately, something better is on the way. It's called Scalable Vector Graphics.More than two years in the works, Scalable Vector Graphics (see the draft standard at SVG at W3C) represents a collaborative effort by some of the biggest shakers in the computer world to find a workable cross-platform solution to Web imaging. Among the firms represented on W3C's SVG committee are such tiny, inconsequential lightweights as IBM, Microsoft, Apple, Xerox, Sun Microsystems, Hewlett-Packard, Netscape, Corel, Adobe, Quark, and Macromedia. Most have committed publicly to supporting SVG in future products. A few, such as IBM and Corel, have already begun distributing public betas of viewing and/or authoring apps.


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