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Thread: Web-Related Careers

  1. #16
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    Jan 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by changintimes
    want to do freelance,

    skillset includes good html, css, and some pretty good javascript, but i guess i wouldn't need to know extensive javascript programming as a web designer, things like object creation i'm week on,

    what i did mean was outsourcing for things like flash or logos, or anything that you would do as a graphics artist, any kind of graphics not specifically related to web design, ofcoarse i would do css, page navigation, layout, etc.,

    how does this sound ?
    I guess that sounds fine, although I'm not your potential employer!
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  2. #17
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    Hey, I've just started getting serious about web development & design, I kind of want to do both. Basically, I am looking for suggestions of what to learn next. Currently I have a lot of experience with C/C++/C# and Java. I'm learning XHTML (HTML 4.1), CSS, and JScript. The list of what skills are needed is great, but I was wondering if anyone has suggestions of what is the next thing to learn and the best way to go about learning them.

    Thanks!
    LT

  3. #18
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    Learn javascript (not Jscript, Microsofts propriety rip off), and a server side language (PHP, ASP.NET, ROR) next. Coming from a programming history they should be pretty easy to pick up on. Alot of servers use Java on the server side as well, so that would be a seamless transition.

    As for how to learn them, since you have programming experience it should be easy. Just set a goal, like setting up a login form, etc and follow some online tutorials to help see the language structure.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by TJ111
    Learn javascript (not Jscript, Microsofts propriety rip off), and a server side language (PHP, ASP.NET, ROR) next. Coming from a programming history they should be pretty easy to pick up on. Alot of servers use Java on the server side as well, so that would be a seamless transition.

    As for how to learn them, since you have programming experience it should be easy. Just set a goal, like setting up a login form, etc and follow some online tutorials to help see the language structure.
    JScript is different from JavaScript! Crap, thanks for telling me now, I haven't done much with it yet. I figured learning languages would get easier considering how little time it took me to learn Java after a few years of C/C++ experience.

    I've been going through the w3schools tutorials on CSS and XHTML/HTML and those have been working out well. Any suggestions on which server-side language I should try next? I've heard a lot about PHP and little about ASP, but not much else. Should I go with PHP first, something else, or does it not really matter?

    Thanks!
    LT

  5. #20
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    I'd go with PHP first (personally). ASP.NET is based off the .NET language so I don't think it's that much different then C#. Plus PHP is more used more commonly.

    The w3schools site is a good site to use as a reference, but lacks alot of the indepth stuff you'll pry need. You'll probaly want some more in depth tutorials. example

  6. #21
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    hey Lord T, leave me a PM,

  7. #22
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    I was curious as to what kind of educational background web designers and developers have? bachelor's or certificates?

    I am trying to find schools in the los angeles area that offer certificate programs in web development and design. I also would like to learn in depth about Flash ActionScript.

    I have taught myself in the past, such as HTML, but I find that a classroom setting, for me, is more a conducive atmosphere to learning.

    Thanks!

  8. #23
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    Alot of web designers come from a Graphic Arts background, whether its a bachelors degree or just lots of experience in the field. Web Developers are usually Computer Science guys, whether its from a Degree or programming experience.

    I have (diagnosed) ADD pretty bad, so classroom settings are near worthless for me (especially lectures). I'm a self taught feller.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikethewebguy
    I was curious as to what kind of educational background web designers and developers have? bachelor's or certificates?

    I am trying to find schools in the los angeles area that offer certificate programs in web development and design. I also would like to learn in depth about Flash ActionScript.

    I have taught myself in the past, such as HTML, but I find that a classroom setting, for me, is more a conducive atmosphere to learning.

    Thanks!
    It depends on the type of job and the type of employer you are thinking of pursuing. There are certain types of employers that will always require a proof of a bachelor's degree before they'll even interview you. There are others that value certification. Then there are some that aren't too picky about education, but value experience.

    For example -- My current employer required a bachelor's degree. Human resources (not IT) screened the submitted resumes, filtering only those with bachelor's degrees (or beyond) to IT for the interview calls. I have a bachelor's degree, but NOT in web programming, actually not even in any computer-related field (in Music). Thankfully, I had enough knowledge & experience to survive the interview and be offered the job.

    I suggest you look at the classified ads in your area, and see what qualifications employers in your area require, especially those businesses in which you'd like to be employed.
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  10. #25
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    Thanks to those who replied.

    If you will forgive my ignorance, I feel a bit lost. You see, I want to work in web IT doing either design or development. They both interest me.

    I first learned web design 8 years ago but could never get hired into the field so it just became a hobby. I have a web portfolio on the web, but I guess it is not very impressive or no one sees any potential in me.

    These days web programming seems to be a must to get any position in web site design and/or development.

    I already know HTML and CSS, plus the software dreamweaver, photoshop, but what should I learn next to make me look more desirable to employers?

    My thinking is that I should learn XML, PHP, AJAX, and Java.

    Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!

  11. #26
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    Anything having to do with databases and server-side programming. There are few static HTML sites on the web anymore.
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  12. #27
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    Thanks.
    do you know if learning Flash ActionScript would open any doors?

    eight years ago i spent quite a sum of money to get certified in webmaster skills and it got me nowhere. eight years later i am an administrative assistant and i hate my life.

    i really don't want to study something only to find out that it isn't going to help me at all.

    thanks!

  13. #28
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    Depends on the industry you want to enter. Just remember, most sites use Flash as a decorative element, so I would guess that heavy usage of Flash would be relegated to entertainment-related websites.
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  14. #29
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    Hi, my name is Katherine, I am new here.
    I read all the resposes and they were all very helpful in answering a lot of the questions I was going to ask.
    I was wondering what schools people tend to find repitable as far as web developing degrees go. I am currently a student at the University of Phoenix taking online class. I am working towards an associates degree in IT/Visual Communications. I believe this is a good school, but wasn't sure if employers would agree so I wanted to see if anyone had heard of it and what they thought about it.
    Also, I have not begun to learn HTML or any like that in my classes yet and was wondering what is a good way to start learning that? Is there a certain book or website that would be helpful with that? I would like get a little ahead. I am a bit impatient!
    Thank you so much for your information!
    Katherine

  15. #30
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    Hi, Katherine -
    I'm actually a webmaster for a program that offers only online courses, so I am very familiar with University of Phoenix.
    I have to admit, there are plenty of "education snobs" out there that look down on any degree not obtained from a four-year university. (We encounter that not only as an offering institution BUT also internally from our staff, who mostly have PHD's.)
    The best thing is to begin working on your portfolio, acquiring good references. I suggest you concentrate on volunteer work, doing websites for non-profit organizations. They make for reputable additions to your portfolio, aren't usually very demanding, and have the visibility for credibility in the sight of a future employer. If you work hard on your portfolio, you'll have something to substantiate your degree, no matter what they think of the institution.

    KDLA
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