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Thread: Visual Studio.NET 2003:Want to build a web

  1. #1
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    Visual Studio.NET 2003:Want to build a web

    Hello:
    I'm new here. I purchased Microsoft Visual Studio.NET a few years ago but have never used it. I want to learn to build my own website. This product states I can use Visual C#, Visual C++, Visual J# or Visual Basic.

    Which one should I choose and where can I go to learn how to do it?

    Thanks,
    Rae

  2. #2
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    I didn't see anyway to edit that post.

    Can anyone at least lead me in the right direction as to which language I should try to learn? I'll get a book for beginners but I don't know which book. I'd like to be able to use this software if possible.

    Rae

  3. #3
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    I personally prefer C# because it's very close to Java and doesn't require an additional runtime library on the server like J# does(unless recent versions of .Net have started including it by default). Most of the examples on Microsoft's site are in Basic and C# too, so you don't have to try translating from the examples to the language you're using.
    54 68 65 42 65 61 72 4D 61 79

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBearMay View Post
    I personally prefer C# because it's very close to Java and doesn't require an additional runtime library on the server like J# does(unless recent versions of .Net have started including it by default). Most of the examples on Microsoft's site are in Basic and C# too, so you don't have to try translating from the examples to the language you're using.
    Thanks! Do you have a recommendation for a beginner book, something like C# for dummies, etc. ?

    The only programming I have done was Visual Basic 5 -6, using DAO.

    Also, do you have a link to Microsoft's site where I might find some of the examples they give with C#?

    Rae

  5. #5
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    Plenty of C# books out there, but a link to start: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/e0s9t4ck.aspx
    54 68 65 42 65 61 72 4D 61 79

  6. #6
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    I'd second the suggestion to start with C#, for a couple of reasons:

    1. It keeps you from making stupid sloppy mistakes
    2. You can work with Java if it were ever required with much less learning curve than jumping from VB
    3. It helps you to have a better understanding of what's going on when you do work with VB down the road


    To avoid a resultant flame-fest, I should state that #1 is my personal opinion, based on 12 years of professional experience. I am aware that there are excellent VB coders (myself included), but I have found that VB tends to encourage sloppy programming practice.

  7. #7
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    Oh, and an excellent resource to start with is 4guysfromrolla.com.

  8. #8
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    I agree with debiguana start with C#, it was developed specially for .NET.

    I think though that you should reconsider the software you're using as it is very out of date, 5 years to be exact and there have been a lot of changes since them. You can get Visual Studio 2008 Professional Edition Academic version for under £100; it's no different from the full professional edition except it is for learning purposes (might get it cheaper on ebay). You'll gain numerous benefits from doing so including the invaluable intellisence feature. If you don't want to splash the cash you can download the express editions for free from here:

    http://www.microsoft.com/express/

    They don't have all the bells and whistles of the full versions but they are free so a good start.

    Regarding learning you could do a course, but I'd recommend a book and use forums when you get stuck, it's much cheaper and more thorough. Check out Amazon just enter c# and check the customer reviews, if loads of people are saying this book is great then you know you've found something worth buying, however click the name of several of those making great posts because if you find they have only ever reviewed that particular book then it reeks of the companies marketing department promoting the book rather than real users; hey it does happen for all books on all subjects believe me. I can't recommend enough reading reviews by buyers for other reasons as well, for example I'm reading an Apress book on C# 2008 for professionals. The book claims beginners can use it but trust me they can't, not in a million years, it is definitely for experienced users only, so don't trust the marketing blurb.
    Last edited by MikeOS; 11-29-2008 at 10:21 PM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeOS View Post
    I agree with debiguana start with C#, it was developed specially for .NET.

    I think though that you should reconsider the software you're using as it is very out of date, 5 years to be exact and there have been a lot of changes since them. You can get Visual Studio 2008 Professional Edition Academic version for under 100; it's no different from the full professional edition except it is for learning purposes (might get it cheaper on ebay). You'll gain numerous benefits from doing so including the invaluable intellisence feature. If you don't want to splash the cash you can download the express editions for free from here:

    http://www.microsoft.com/express/

    They don't have all the bells and whistles of the full versions but they are free so a good start.

    Regarding learning you could do a course, but I'd recommend a book and use forums when you get stuck, it's much cheaper and more thorough. Check out Amazon just enter c# and check the customer reviews, if loads of people are saying this book is great then you know you've found something worth buying, however click the name of several of those making great posts because if you find they have only ever reviewed that particular book then it reeks of the companies marketing department promoting the book rather than real users; hey it does happen for all books on all subjects believe me. I can't recommend enough reading reviews by buyers for other reasons as well, for example I'm reading an Apress book on C# 2008 for professionals. The book claims beginners can use it but trust me they can't, not in a million years, it is definitely for experienced users only, so don't trust the marketing blurb.
    I thought I would upgrade later. But before shelling out more money, I wanted to see if I could use this one at all. It may be that it is just beyond the time and effort I can expend right now to learn it. I thought if I could learn a little using this one, since I already bought it some years ago and never used it, then I will be more encouraged to upgrade.

    BTW, that 2008 express edition: I did download and install it and finally UNinstalled it! It kept freezing in the design view. Someone on another forum gave a possible solution but I had already uninstalled it at that point. But when I researched that error, I saw a LOT of people were having that same problem. I hope if I upgrade with a *paid* version, I won't have that problem.

    btw, I am coming to this from very little background and skills. I learned a little VB 6 programming to build an application totally around DAO. By time I got that huge project finished, DAO wasn't being supported any more with new Windows. That was really upsetting! It was all I knew how to do!

    Thanks for the tips. I don't want to make the same mistake as before by learning something that becomes outdated once I finally get the hang of it!

    Rae

  10. #10
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    Don't worry too much about not being able to learn with VS.Net 2003. I actively work with projects every day using .Net 1.1 (i.e. VS.Net 2003). There is not such a huge difference between .Net 1.1 and 2.0 that you won't be able to take your skills with you and learn the new technologies.

    Being that you have the money invested in VS 2003, learn with what you have, and upgrade at a later point in time once you're comfortable with the language.

    Thanks.
    -Doug

    P.S.: Don't give up too easily - .NET is a great framework, and the skills, once learned, are very useful. If you run into a spot, ask around on various forums (including this one) - there's plenty of helpful folks to help you learn.

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