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Thread: GoDaddy Virtual Dedicated: Is the Assisted Service Plan worth it?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    119

    GoDaddy Virtual Dedicated: Is the Assisted Service Plan worth it?

    Yearly costs for a GoDaddy virtual dedicated server is ~$300. I have been using their Assisted Service Plan for $700, and I want to dump this service to save money.

    I am a PHP/MySQL web developer and I want to take on the challenge of administering my own server.

    I have Plesk installed on the server, and I imagine I will have command line access to the dedicated server.

    What unknown challenges lie ahead for me? What are things to monitor to keep the site running efficiently? What should I be using to connect to the server? What tools are available to help me be more efficient?

    Any advice would be helpful, thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    India
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    Try
    Last edited by chazzy; 06-13-2009 at 10:49 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    The Garden State
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    in my opinion, their assisted service plan is not worth the money, but it really depends on your skill level. apache based servers really don't require much maintenance and the only thing you can do to clear an error is to stop and restart the daemon.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Rocky Mount NC
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    10

    server

    I have been using my own server for years. I bought a computer, software, and got a static IP plus my domain name. The only problem I have had was power failure when I was gone and my DSL modem, which would clog up on me if I had to many hits. It depends how fancy you want to get! I still run a web site on it but haven't kept it up like I should. My musical site was taking all my time. I have two sites, and the musical site is hosted by godaddy with no trouble, my cost will be in the neigborhood of about $170.00. I have a lot of music on the site which is hbronner.org.
    Good luck

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Wisconsin
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    Server administration can be a great deal of fun, if you're into that sort of thing. But, I would definitely start with a good book and a local installation that won't cost you any cash for a reinstall. And of course, whenever you have a particular setup/installation question, Google knows the answer.

    I'm kind of a simpleton and a slow learner. So, of course I have to recommend going the safer, slow learner's route ...
    1. Find out what *nix flavor you'll be working with. I have two recommendations here:
      • FreeBSD: It's incredibly stable. FreeBSD systems tend to go years without needed a reboot. They're generally more of a pain to work with though, and since it's a BSD, your favorite commands tend to work slightly differently (paramters are required in different orders and so forth).
      • CentOS: It's probably the easiest *nix to install and configure. First step after installation (or VPS purchase) is to install yum (if not already installed). From there, getting your LAMP stack working is cake.
    2. Buy and skim through an administrator's guide to your choice.
    3. Install a copy on a local computer (buy an old crappy PC for $25 to $100)
    4. Walk through setting the server up, bookmarking and highlighting or writing notes for important steps along the way.
    5. Get comfortable with the BASH shell, VIM, and the necessary config files.
    6. Shell out for that VPS and pick up configuring where they left off (You'll probably have to configure the LAMP stack a little bit).


    Bear in mind, if your'e not already somewhat familiar with the *nix command line, it can take awhile to learn--even for some of the more speedy learners. Most folks who confidently tap flawless command after command into the prompt have already spent months or years mistyping commands and accidentally destroying their systems despite the plethora of reference materials they have at their disposal.

    Once you're confident working with your *nix and you have your VPS ordered and ready, you'll be SSHing into your server with the ssh command on your local *nix or OS X box, or Putty on your local Windows box. The most lightweight text editor I am aware of on *nix systems is VI/VIM. It's a bit of a challenge to get used to, but I highly recommend it for your configuration and on-server editing needs.

    If you happen to choose CentOS, just remember that the easiest and best way to install software is with the yum package manager. Don't build thing from source unless you absolutely must! Additionally, don't start and stop services manually if you don't have to. Use the service command. And of course, when you've forgotten what parameters a command takes, check the manpage first! (man <command name>) If you don't even know what command you need, you can man a related command and look at the commands at the bottom of the page.

    In terms of server monitoring ... if you think you'll need that kind of thing, two things to check out are Cacti and Nagios. Cacti will provide statistics about CPU usage, bandwidth, etc. Nagios allows you to monitor service statuses and send you emails or texts if a service goes down and needs attention. ... Cacti may be able to do that at this point too--I haven't done a fresh install in a long time.

    Ok ... sorry for the long-windedness. I'm excited for ya ... should be a lot of fun.

    Good luck, and have fun!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    119
    very helpful guys thanks... thanks again jon for all that

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    195
    getting used to using the terminal, the commands that you need to use, and the file structure of unix/linux based systems helps a lot as well.

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