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Thread: how much is my code worth?

  1. #1
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    how much is my code worth?

    I'm creating a website at work. For no extra money. (they are saying they don't need to pay more for workout side my job description.)

    Where can I upload my code and get price on it?
    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Well...PHP, Apache, and MySQL are free. Is your web site worth more than them?

    I'm not sure you could get any really meaningful data by posting your code somewhere, and it may also be a legal risk for you since more than likely your employer can claim it's the company's code, not yours (since they are paying you to write it).

    I think of more use would be to do some googling and find a few sites that post IT salary data by geographic location, and try to get an idea what junior web developers (or whatever you consider your level to be) are getting paid in your area. Then you can take that data to your employer and discuss the need for an increase with him. (Or when you find out what junior web developers are making these days, maybe don't show him and just keep working. )
    "Please give us a simple answer, so that we don't have to think, because if we think, we might find answers that don't fit the way we want the world to be."
    ~ Terry Pratchett in Nation

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  3. #3
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    The main benefit to you is experience.

    I guess you haven't been asked to do this website in your own time; you just want to.

    Get some opinions on the finished article, and then consider working for yourself (even part time to start with).

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrutusUnix View Post
    I'm creating a website at work. For no extra money. (they are saying they don't need to pay more for workout side my job description.)

    Where can I upload my code and get price on it?
    Thanks
    I seriously advise you seek help from a lawyer who specialises in employment law in your country. You should find that your employer is acting illegally by employing you on a lower wage to do a more technical job that entitles you to pay.

    If your employer had to employ professional services, then they would have to pay and web sites for companys / business are not cheap when employing a professional company to do the work.

  5. #5
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    This happened to me recently, I'm being paid as an $11/hr web developer for a state school. I designed a skin for uPortal, which took roughly 90 hours, so I got $1000. Later on, I found out that the guy who skinned our uPortal before me got paid $20,000 because he was a contractor. I felt cheated because I believe the code I produced was the same quality as his.

    I agree with junkmale, ask a lawyer because you shouldn't be cheated on something as potentially profitable as this.

  6. #6
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    A lawyer may help, but also they may just be a cost to you.

    You should find that your employer is acting illegally by employing you on a lower wage to do a more technical job that entitles you to pay.
    Why? If you've agreed to work for a wage and take on more responsibilities with no more money then that's your lookout.

    If your employer had to employ professional services, then they would have to pay and web sites for companys / business are not cheap when employing a professional company to do the work.
    Sure, that's why many companies have employees, e.g. cleaners, typists, accountants - all could be contracted from a professional company.

    I felt cheated because I believe the code I produced was the same quality as his.
    . Perhaps, but I guess you were happy with the deal or else you wouldn't have done it. This is the way of the world, everyone wants someone to work for less, and while people will work for less then why not take advantage.

    I've actually designed and written quite big computer systems in my own time, initially for no extra money, to prove to my then employer that I was at least as good as the so called professionals. My systems were in use until the company got sold, and as I was the main person controlling all the computer systems you bet I got looked after at pay and profit share time.

    I now work for myself.

  7. #7
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    I'll give you $87.13 right now, deal? oh wait is it secure? if so add $10 to my initial offer. -$10 if its not php6 compatible.

  8. #8
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    Web development, even if just done with a WYSIWYG editor, is a job that requires additional experience/training beyond what your boss gives you at your job, and is a service that is not part of the job you are doing.

    I would tell your boss that will do the job under a completely separate contract, with the hourly rate or flat price described in the contract, and keep it completely separate from your normal work (so don't be working on it at work).

  9. #9
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    Don't forget, if your code is actually something creative, new, and awesome, http://themeforest.net/ would be a place that you could submit your work to get it valued.

    Be warned.. as ThemeForest (like the whole Envato network) is an incredibly high-quality site, only incredibly high-quality work is accepted. So, if your work is not bleeding-edge fabtastic or just gorgeous to look at and highly functional, your best bet is to try something like HotScripts.
    Refreshed | Web Design
    Your Dreams. Our Reality. Refreshing, isn't it?
    Pierce@RefreshedWeb.com
    https://www.RefreshedWeb.com

  10. #10
    You should be required to increase the reward for your work is accomplished.you have to fight for. this is your rights and freedoms.

  11. #11
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    Hmmm...there seems to be an ongoing assumption here that the OP's "regular" job is not worth as much as that of a web developer. How do we know this for sure?

    Also, every place I have worked where I had an actual job description, that job description was never limiting in what I could do; it always included some clause at the end that amounted to saying "...and any other tasks management asks me to do."

    So, I'm not saying the OP has to do this job just because his (or her) management asked him to; but there is nothing I know of that says he is legally entitled to more money, nor is there anything that prohibits him from discussing it with his manager and saying he won't do it unless he's paid more. And if he does decide to refuse to do it, there's nothing I know of that can stop his manager from having someone else do it, and then likely give that someone else a promotion or better pay raise than the OP when that time comes along. In other words, there is no black or white, right or wrong answer that I see here: it has to be a dialogue between the OP and his manager to either come up with a mutually agreeable solution or else the OP moving on to work somewhere else.

    One thing that does seem pretty black and white to me, though, is that publishing the code on the web without his management's permission could be a mistake that would quite possibly give his management much more legal right to terminate his employment than refusing to do the task in the first place without more money; so be careful.

    Again, I'm not saying "just do it," but rather to make it a dialogue between you and your manager (or his manager if your manager will not give you satisfaction): our opinion does not matter anywhere near as much as his does.
    "Please give us a simple answer, so that we don't have to think, because if we think, we might find answers that don't fit the way we want the world to be."
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by NogDog View Post
    ...Also, every place I have worked where I had an actual job description, that job description was never limiting in what I could do; it always included some clause at the end that amounted to saying "...and any other tasks management asks me to do." ...
    Which is fine if you are qualifed to do those tasks or have practical experience doing them. If you were asked by an employer to do something that you have no experience in, you have the right to decline the invatation to participate in the job and have it allocated to someone who is more qualified in that area.

    If your employer asked you to and you did the job and something went seriously wrong, where will the buck stop? You also have to remember that health and safety plays a major part in this also. Asking members of staff to do things outside of their usual tasks can lead to injury, mistakes and other scenarios that can happen and have happend to me!

    You would think that helping the warehouse staff to unload a lorry is no big deal. However it is if your involved in a serious accident like me and nearly ended up cut in half. It is funny how my particular boss lost the security tape from the loading dock camers and I got sh*t canned for compensation and eventual loss of my job because of the back injury I sustained.

    So in some circumstances, being asked to do a seemingly easy job can lead to situations that put your health and well being at risk. Now if your asked to run the post to the mail van and you agree, no big deal until you hurt yourself or have an accident. So when it comes to clauses buried in contracts like that... be warned that the most simplest of tasks can lead to serious injury.

  13. #13
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    I think it's pretty rare you would have the right to decline. Like Nogdog, I've never seen a job description without "any other duties as requested by management..." tacked on the bottom. You can refuse to do it of course, but not necessarily without consequences.

    And the warehouse example is a bit different. Most companies will require you to have health and safety training etc before doing warehouse related physical tasks, but sitting at a computer programming is a different kettle of fish, especially since most non-physical jobs already involve being at a computer these days.

  14. #14
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    For sure you always have a right to decline. The question that has to go with that is what will the side effects be of doing so. You also have a right to decline a promotion because you don't feel ready for the additional responsibility. However, practically every time I've seen someone make such a refusal, they seldom get a second offer for such a promotion. It's all politics, psychology, power plays, and all that other crap we all hate about working in a typical business hierarchy (especially when we're toward the bottom of the hierarchy).

    You can certainly say that it's too far outside of your job description and if your manager wants you to do it, then you want to get paid more for it. Legally, the employer may or may not have the right to insist or else terminate you -- I don't know, I'm not a lawyer and it likely varies between legal jurisdictions, anyway.

    All I'm really saying is to talk about it openly with your manager and try to find an agreeable compromise. If your manager is not someone you feel you can talk with as a social equal and work together to find common ground, then it may be time to search for another job -- not that this is the best of all times to be doing that.
    "Please give us a simple answer, so that we don't have to think, because if we think, we might find answers that don't fit the way we want the world to be."
    ~ Terry Pratchett in Nation

    eBookworm.us

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