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Thread: Will dreamweaver make my site look the same in all browsers. Should I use it?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Will dreamweaver make my site look the same in all browsers. Should I use it?

    Ive got a decent understanding of html now. Not really an advanced one by any means. But I passed the codeacademy.com web fundamentals course. However, I am still having a lot of problems. Especially when it comes to making my site look the same in all browsers. Will dreamweaver or visual studio solve these problems? Does dreamweaver easily do mysql or jquery? I need to put jquery java and mysql into my site but I dont know how yet and I think I've got a long road ahead of me learning those things. It would be nice if dreamweaver made it easy.

  2. #2
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    No, and your not asking the write question.

    Dreamweaver is a waste of your money, so I do not suggest it. In fact, I can do more then dreamweaver could imagine on a local host setup. Which is what I suggest in your situation. Localhost is bassically like a server running on your computer, so if you where to type localhost in your url, you would see whats hosted on your local host. It is not easy for a newer person to do, however when all the headaches are over with you will get really good learning benefits from setting it up.

    What you need:
    Apache
    mysql
    php / python or what ever scripting you want
    a monster - you will be up a while tonight

    If your running debian (linux) you can easily get set up by typing in terminal:
    $ sudo apt-get install apache2 apache2-doc mysql-server php5 libapache2-mod-php5 php5-mysql

    and can cross of the monster on the list of needed things. However, if your on something else, someone else can tell you how to setup localhost.

    for jquery, just link the headers... or what ever its called in web development..
    likewise:
    <script #include "jqueryheader.h">

  3. #3
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    I use Dreamweaver in the school open lab so cost is not a factor for me.

    Do NOT expect any program to write any code for you (if you do you will end up with cluttered garbage).

    But Dreamweaver is a wonderful, helpful editing tool -- giving you shortcuts, highlighting errors, saving time, avoiding typos. You have 3 view options: Code, Split, Design. Work in the code-side of Split to write your own code and see the instant results in the design-side.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by waxdoc View Post
    Do NOT expect any program to write any code for you (if you do you will end up with cluttered garbage).
    Yes, and also their are web standards that are not followed, so you have to look in each browsers documentation of support compatability wise (css more so is what Im refering to).

    HOWEVER, this is very wrong in some cases. If your doing things like WebGL, then you WILL NEED a javascript compiler otherwise, good luck porting your c++ code to javascript.

  5. #5
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    You should learn to write all of your HTML Markup by hand -- it is the only way to master it and thus become a true master of your web pages. Commercial code generating programs in general produce "tag soup" that does not validate. If you memorize all of the HTML elements and attributes by heart (not at all difficult) you will be ready to take on RDFa in preparation for the Semantic Web!

    I personally use, and have for many years now, HTML-Kit 292 which is a free Web page Editing/Authoring facility that provides the following features:

    Can be used as a plain text editor for hand coding ala MS Notepad - that is the way I use it.
    Pre-formed constructs, elements & attributes can be inserted via drop-down menus (until you learn them by heart)
    Split-screen viewing of code generation "on the fly"
    Previewing of page layout in multi graphical Browsers - that you specify.
    Selection and use of Doctype headers and name spaces - HTML/XHTML/XML/RDFa
    Syntax checking and correction via "Tidy" plug-in "on the fly"
    Tidy generated "pretty print" code - indented code & identification of escaped characters.
    Multiple File type editing - html, .css, .php, .rdfa, .js ..... etc.
    HTML-XHTML Markup conversion
    Online .html & .css document validation "on the fly"
    Spell checker and Thesaurus - on demand plug ins
    Search and replace facility for content management
    Last edited by polyglot; 02-16-2013 at 06:02 PM. Reason: added info

  6. #6
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    All Dreamweaver and other such trash generators will do is help you avoid learning to actually do something creative. However it will help you learn how to ask for help on forums because it will break your heart every time you want to actually step outside the narrow DW world.

    As for looking tha same in all browsers... Nothing will do that... It might happen some time after a Fiat looks like Rolls Royce. Think about it logically ... browsers come from different manufacturers... browser need to be optimized for multiple operating systems... the market is competitive... non-of the manufacturers implements the standards the same way.

  7. #7
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    So I do know how to write html by hand pretty decently. What do I need to know to make stuff look the same in all browsers. My stuff looks different in every browser and sometimes it looks really bad.

  8. #8
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    It is not going to look the same no matter what you do. A Ford does not look like a Chevy because they come from different manufacturers; each with their own design and style. Browsers are no different. The rendering reflects the design and style of the browser maker.

    You have the best chance of getting it close by using 100% standards compliant code. It is almost certain that the users are coming to your site using only one browser at a time. They are not there to compare, and they don't care if there is a difference. If something looks bad in one browser, then the most like cause is bad code or bad development practices.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by COBOLdinosaur View Post
    It is not going to look the same no matter what you do. A Ford does not look like a Chevy because they come from different manufacturers; each with their own design and style. Browsers are no different. The rendering reflects the design and style of the browser maker.

    You have the best chance of getting it close by using 100% standards compliant code. It is almost certain that the users are coming to your site using only one browser at a time. They are not there to compare, and they don't care if there is a difference. If something looks bad in one browser, then the most like cause is bad code or bad development practices.
    All so very true.

    Do not aspire to "pixel perfect" layouts, see: You Can't Get Every Page to Look Identical

    It is the quality and usefulness of the content and the ease of navigation through it that are of the greatest importance to most web page users.

    James

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