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Thread: Dreamweaver, Visual Studio, or.. ?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    Dreamweaver, Visual Studio, or.. ?

    Hello everybody, I was wondering which program you prefer to use when working with websites, I'm very curious on which one would be the best one and such, so please state your reasons and arguments. I've pretty much only tried Dreamweaver, Visual Studio and SharePoint. Personally from the ones I've tried, I feel that SharePoint is fastest and easiest one at quickly making a simple HTML template, but Dreamweaver and Visual Studio are better when it comes to a bit bigger projects. I'm not a website expert, but I'm kind of trying to learn.

    I know that a lot of people would probably just use "Notepad" or "Notepad++", but I think I'm a bit too lazy for that, though if you want to suggest using Notepad or Notepad++, please come up with extremely good reasons, I might get convinced!

    I appreciate any responses!
    Thank you in advance!

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    If you just want to make a simple and fast HTML template, then whatever works for you most efficiently is fine. If you want to really learn and understand what's going on "under the hood", then writing the raw HTML and CSS with a text editor is the way to go. But that doesn't mean you need another editor: unless something has changed since the few years ago when I last used it, doesn't DW have a source code mode where you can directly write/edit HTML (etc.)? And sometimes the fast-and-easy approach makes perfect sense, and other times getting down in the weeds to optimize, customize, and make the page do exactly what you want is what you need.

    In my case, I'm mainly a server-side developer, and I use Komodo Edit both at work and at home (trying to get work to invest in Komodo IDE ). It's "just" a text editor, but has syntax checking, syntax highlighting, auto-complete and tips for a whole slew of coding and mark-up languages, so I use it for everything from PHP, JavaScript, HTML/CSS, SQL, and JSON, to name the most common things I use.
    "Please give us a simple answer, so that we don't have to think, because if we think, we might find answers that don't fit the way we want the world to be."
    ~ Terry Pratchett in Nation

    eBookworm.us

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by NogDog View Post
    If you just want to make a simple and fast HTML template, then whatever works for you most efficiently is fine. If you want to really learn and understand what's going on "under the hood", then writing the raw HTML and CSS with a text editor is the way to go. But that doesn't mean you need another editor: unless something has changed since the few years ago when I last used it, doesn't DW have a source code mode where you can directly write/edit HTML (etc.)? And sometimes the fast-and-easy approach makes perfect sense, and other times getting down in the weeds to optimize, customize, and make the page do exactly what you want is what you need.

    In my case, I'm mainly a server-side developer, and I use Komodo Edit both at work and at home (trying to get work to invest in Komodo IDE ). It's "just" a text editor, but has syntax checking, syntax highlighting, auto-complete and tips for a whole slew of coding and mark-up languages, so I use it for everything from PHP, JavaScript, HTML/CSS, SQL, and JSON, to name the most common things I use.
    Alright, thank you very much for the reply! And yeah, DW does have the feature where if you're starting to write a tag, it'll come up with the variables you need to fill out for an example. It also has a complete list of tags where you can basically just click on one, and it'll put it in for you to fill out. If you know what I mean. Either way, I've read numerous of articles and tutorials on HTML and CSS, but my memory just doesn't stretch far enough for me to actually remember everything I read, so for some reason, everytime I enter Notepad to start doing something, I forget the tags. I don't know if any of you have tried that before, but it happens all the time for me, and it's incredibly annoying.

  4. #4
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    Heh...if you think I've got every PHP function memorized, you've got another think coming. I spend some part of almost every day on php.net to figure out which function to use or how to use one I vaguely remember.

    Anyway, the only reason I would use plain old Notepad to edit any code is because it was the only thing available for some strange reason.
    "Please give us a simple answer, so that we don't have to think, because if we think, we might find answers that don't fit the way we want the world to be."
    ~ Terry Pratchett in Nation

    eBookworm.us

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    56
    I used to use Aptana. It has some nice features. But lately I have been using Vim. It is really great once you get used to it. You have autocompletion, syntax checking and cool text editing features all together. It does require getting used to and setting it up correctly, but the time spent doing that, is well worth it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    3
    I prefer Codelobstr PHP Edition
    This free editor works best for me.

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