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Thread: Learning from scratch to be a front end developer

  1. #1
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    Learning from scratch to be a front end developer

    Hello. I recently graduated from a state university with a degree in biology.
    I hope it's not too late to realize what I am really interested in.

    A few weeks ago, my friend introduced me to web development, and I already read a few books on HTML and CSS. I ENJOYED THEM A LOT. I did not get stressed at all while I was trying to build my own website. I noticed that I was having fun while solving problems.

    Anyways, if I am "smart" and "passionate" enough, how long would it take me to be a front end developer? Good enough to get an entry level job? I already know the basics of HTML and CSS. Learning JS currently.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
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    Not long at all.

    I'd recommend starting with freelance just to gain experience and make a little side cash.

    But as far as 'How long will it take for me to learn everything I need to know to do the job?'. It depends. If you've already learned HTML and CSS, then you're halfway there.

    JavaScript will be a headache, but after that pick up some jQuery.

    Then PHP.

    Then MySQL.

    Took me 3 months, while juggling a couple of part time jobs.

    But as far as entry level goes, most don't care if you have a web dev/designer degree. They'd rather have you know the material and have a passion for it over a slip of paper any day, but individual experiences may vary.

  3. #3
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    Thank you so much!!! Could you please tell me where I can find freelance jobs?

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by JameyS View Post
    But as far as entry level goes, most don't care if you have a web dev/designer degree. They'd rather have you know the material and have a passion for it over a slip of paper any day, but individual experiences may vary.
    In fact some places will consider a degree to mean you have NO clue what you are doing and have been packed full of **** by ignorant halfwits not qualified to be teaching jack **** to anybody; as such they'll show you the door and never call you back.

    The only people who take degrees in IT seriously are the "suits with checkbooks" who don't know enough about the subject to be hiring anyone in the first place.

    Mind you, there's about an equal mix of both people who will scoff at the degree and the ignorant fools who will blindly believe it means something more than four to eight years of alcohol poisoning and being led own the garden path to failure.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by gamesdf View Post
    Thank you so much!!! Could you please tell me where I can find freelance jobs?
    Dear, for freelance job there are many resources such as *****, Freelancer, Elance, PPH and other.

    But only work as freelancer is not good way, you should join job and in parallel do freelancing. Because in company you learn more which is not in freelancing.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Avrillavigne View Post
    Dear, for freelance job there are many resources such as *****, Freelancer, Elance, PPH and other.

    But only work as freelancer is not good way, you should join job and in parallel do freelancing. Because in company you learn more which is not in freelancing.
    Thank you

    Can you guys please evaluate my schedule for self-studying? I am planning to get an entry-level front end dev job first and then study more about back-end stuff later on.

    Try to finish reading HTMl/CSS books by the end of November.


    Try to finish Javascript + jquery by the end of January
    ---------------------------------------

    [From here, start building websites extensively] - START STUDYING PRACTICALLY


    Start learning about resp web + bootstrap in February = A LOT OF PRACTICE FOR THIS MONTH FOR WHAT I"VE STUDIED SO FAR


    Start learning about angularjs in March


    REVIEW EXTENSIVELY AS NEEDED in April + May = A LOT OF PRACTICE


    Get into PHP/MySQL when I feel I am "GOOD" with front end stuff (probably in June)

  7. #7
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    Personally, I prefer specializing in the server-side stuff and leaving the front-end stuff to those with the patience to deal with browser differences, device screen size differences, pointy-haired bosses who love the latest shiny things, etc., etc.; so go to it and become a great front-end developer.
    "Please give us a simple answer, so that we don't have to think, because if we think, we might find answers that don't fit the way we want the world to be."
    ~ Terry Pratchett in Nation

    eBookworm.us

  8. #8
    Some advice:

    Quote Originally Posted by gamesdf View Post
    Try to finish Javascript + jquery by the end of January
    Learn to use JS without jQuery or any other framework bull FIRST -- you'll quickly find that jQuery is a fat, bloated steaming pile of manure used by halfwits to piss on websites from orbit.

    Quote Originally Posted by gamesdf View Post
    Start learning about resp web + bootstrap in February
    Learn to use CSS3 to make responsive layouts from semantic markup WITHOUT HTML 5 tags FIRST -- you'll quickly realize that bootcrap and it's kine are a fat, bloated steaming pile of manure used by halfwits to piss on websites from orbit. People currently using it would be far better off finding a stick to scrape it off with.

    Quote Originally Posted by gamesdf View Post
    Start learning about angularjs in March
    Would you care to venture a guess as to what I would say to this one?

    Developers on the whole are dumber for these stupid malfing garbage "frameworks" even existing, and I've rarely if ever seen a site built with them that was worth a flying purple fish.

  9. #9
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    It's a two-edged sword of sorts, though: regardless of whether you as an individual like/dislike a given tool, if it is in wide use and you want to maximize your employability (probably not a word?), it still pays to learn to use it -- if for no other reason than at some point you'll have to maintain someone else's code that uses it. But don't let learning the tools get in the way of actually learning how to program. If you really learn the latter, learning to use the tools should be comparatively simple. Learning to use a saw doesn't do a whole lot of good if you have no concept of how to actually build a house -- you might end up with something like this: http://www.fubiz.net/en/2014/01/03/i...st-tree-house/

    "Please give us a simple answer, so that we don't have to think, because if we think, we might find answers that don't fit the way we want the world to be."
    ~ Terry Pratchett in Nation

    eBookworm.us

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by NogDog View Post
    But don't let learning the tools get in the way of actually learning how to program.
    ... and will let you identify when you have the right tool for the job, the pointless tool, or when things like a "framework" is turning you into a tool.

  11. #11
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    Hm.. So you are suggesting me to move all frameworks down the schedule?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by gamesdf View Post
    Thank you

    Can you guys please evaluate my schedule for self-studying? I am planning to get an entry-level front end dev job first and then study more about back-end stuff later on.

    Try to finish reading HTMl/CSS books by the end of November.


    Try to finish Javascript + jquery by the end of January
    ---------------------------------------

    [From here, start building websites extensively] - START STUDYING PRACTICALLY


    Start learning about resp web + bootstrap in February = A LOT OF PRACTICE FOR THIS MONTH FOR WHAT I"VE STUDIED SO FAR


    Start learning about angularjs in March


    REVIEW EXTENSIVELY AS NEEDED in April + May = A LOT OF PRACTICE


    Get into PHP/MySQL when I feel I am "GOOD" with front end stuff (probably in June)
    Join any company and tell them that you want to learn. mean to say that join as part time. many companies offers part time work. it will be beneficial for you. Not being freelance in starting when you are in learning.

  13. #13
    Either down the schedule or off them entirely -- though NogDog is right you should learn enough of them so that when you are cleaning up other people's messes you have some clue what they were TRYING to do, and be able to say "yeah, I know it".

    But really for most websites they are all utter and complete trash that pisses all over the usability and speed; the developers who use them really having no business writing front-end code in the first place.

    BUT they are hot and trendy; and most clients know them more as sick buzzwords they are "expected" to have without any real understanding of what they are, what they do, and what they cannot do. Quite often that means you either have to educate the client as to the folly of trying to use them, or pack them full of sand and pretend you are listening to their ignorant bull while pretty much doing little more than paying lip-service to their use.

    jQuery, Bootstrap, YUI, BluePrint, HTML 5 -- 99% of the time a potential client brings them up you can make the same assumption you would if they said "web 2.0" -- they have no idea what it is, what it does, or what good it is, but they heard about it in Forbes.

    Which as I often say taking technical advice from the pages of Forbes is like taking financial advice from the pages of Popular Electronics...

  14. #14
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    By all means leave PHP and SQL database handling to later, but I would strongly recommend learning to use PHP include files, and how to read and use POST and GET variables, BEFORE getting in to JavaScript. In my opinion, these are ESSENTIAL features for building web sites that are larger than a handful of pages.

    Similarly, you need a firm grasp of CSS. Many inexperienced coders fall into the trap of using JS for things that are better implemented in HTML, CSS and/or PHP. Remember, your web site should be fully functional WITHOUT JS. JS is for eye catching goodies, not essential functionality (like navigation bars etc...).

    Lastly, you do NOT need a framework to make web pages fully responsive. All you need is to make the web page elastic (by not using a fixed width layout) then adding media queries to provide break points where page elements need to be restyled, suppressed, moved etc...

  15. #15
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    Oct 2014
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    Thank you everyone for the advice.
    I made my first responsive website with media queries this week. I am so happy :P.

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