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Thread: 4 reasons to use HTML5 for responsive web design - feedback appreciated

  1. #1
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    Smile 4 reasons to use HTML5 for responsive web design - feedback appreciated

    I am curious to know what programmers think about using HTML5 as a focus on responsive web design. And what editors do you use for HTML5 development? There are so many IDEs available, some with user interfaces like Visual Studio.

    I have read over the pros and there are actually a number of reasons for using HTML5 to build cross compatible apps and not just native apps. Here are the 4 reasons I believe to be aware of though do add your own findings.

    1. Cross-platform. Developers can produce applications a lot faster and only need to develop one version. All devices support the HTML5 framework and any applications built will run on various platforms. For mobile development, this presents a strong tool for developing apps for iOS, Android, Windows, and Blackberry. No need to wait for approval from one store, submit the app wherever you like for access from a store, the cloud, wherever. A developer can use jQuery Mobile built on the jQuery UI for mobile applications, great news for fans of JavaScript.

    2. HTML5 offers developers a low cost entry to application development. With HTML5 being so popular, this makes it easy to find a programmer at affordable rates. It is much harder to find a dedicated Android or iOS programmer and when you find one, their rates may be quite high. HTML5 development presents an alternative cost effective solution. There are many kits available for the creation of HTML5 apps allowing simple user-friendly development for quick turnaround times.

    3. How many times have you used applications built to assume you have an internet connection? While the chances are that we all do at the best of times, what if the hosted app cannot establish a connection? HTML5 apps use the AppCache API for offline usage, saving any data locally for sending to the remote server later when convenient. Surely, this adds more flexibility.

    4. User experience. Applications built on HTML5 only need a browser window to run. This makes life a lot easier to distribute any application. Next, depending on the device used, you can change the resolution of the app. Finally, any distributed app can update automatically. No user intervention for manual updates as once the app is visited, the latest updated version will always be seen.

    Amazon now supports HTML5 downloads by allowing developers to charge for it and the chrome store fills up with HTML5 apps. If you are hard coding in HTML5 either for fun or at work, do let me know what editors you use. I am looking at several free solutions, something with an IDE feel and point-n-click functionality.

    Are you using HTML5 and if so, how do you view the future of responsive design across mobile platforms?

  2. #2
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    Just to dampen your enthusiasm for HTML5/CSS3:

    1. It is not finalized yet, so is liable to change.

    2. HTML5/CSS3 is not supported in its entirety on any platform (contrary to the impression you gave).

    3. Some of the proposed changes in HTML5 are, arguably, retrograde garbage that hopefully will not make the final version.

    4. Some of the bits of HTML5/CSS3 that are supported require browser specific syntax, which is messy and short-term.

    5. Legacy browsers like IE8 and below, which are still widely used (though diminishing), do not support HTML5/CSS3 at all. Therefore sites should be designed to degrade gracefully on them.

    So yes, HTML5/CSS3 has the potential to be "all things to all men" but it is not there yet.

  3. #3
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    The biggest problem with HTML5 is it allows for very sloppy coding on the programmers part, by that I mean it allows them to get away with things other versions would at least scream at. Just my opinion.

  4. #4
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    What tools would you recommend if you were to go with HTML5 over the year ahead?

  5. #5
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    The same tools I already use: A programmers text editor, Wampserver to run PHP code, and a range of browsers to test against.

  6. #6
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    The one I am trying to use is jResponse. So far, easy to create an app, and the IDE is familiar. http://jresponse.net/index.html. That is fine jedaisoul but I like a mix of page design ability in an IDE (point n click to a point) and javascript.

  7. #7
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    And the code you generate is...?

  8. #8
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    7 best reasons to use HTML5:

    - It’s multi-platform
    - It's cost effective
    - Developers love the easy life
    - Fragmentation isn’t any worse than it is natively
    - It’s only going to get better
    - You can update apps faster
    - Good resources are never too far away

  9. #9
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    Thanks clevelandslim, that sums up the reasons brilliantly!

  10. #10
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    I was totally put off HTML5 for now after reading jedaisoul's informative post, and now I'm back on it after reading clevelandslim's great list... Confusion reigns supreme! I think I'm gonna give it a go... After all, cost and ease are 2 of the best pros I can think of

  11. #11
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    I rest my case...
    Plus change is good not bad.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jedaisoul View Post
    And the code you generate is...?
    Jedaisoul, to pick up on this, still experimenting and I will provide you with a site to use in due course.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevedev View Post
    Jedaisoul, to pick up on this, still experimenting and I will provide you with a site to use in due course.
    LOL, meant to say still experimenting and will provide a link to a site created in jResponse in due course.

  14. #14
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    Honestly, what the blue blazes does HTML 5 have to do with responsive design, much less what advantages does it actually offer over using HTML 4.01 or XHTML 1.0 so far as that is concerned?

    The answer, ABSOLUTELY NOTHING.

    Responsive layout is CSS3, there is nothing preventing you from using it with the actual recommendation doctypes.

    Given the halfwit loosening of the structural rules, re-introduction of old redundancies, creation of all new redundancies, and pissing all over document structure with the garbage allegedly semantic tags I cannot fathom why so many people keep singing it's praises; whenever someone calls it "the future" I can't help but think "REALLY? Looks like the worst of 1997 to me!"

    But like most of the actual cool innovations of the past six to eight years -- CSS3, ECMAScript 1.6/newer, the new web API's -- they seem to be slapped under HTML 5's banner to try and hide the fact that the emperor is standing there bare for the world to see. You take those away and actually talk about HTML 5 as a markup specification, there is little of value to anyone who has more than two brain cells to rub together other than stuff for building crapplets (MANIFEST) or the new INPUT types.

    Nothing like watching 15 years of progress being hung, drawn and quartered, burned at the stake, and then hoping we can bury it in secret so the WhatWG doesn't defile it's grave.
    Java is to JavaScript as Ham is to Hamburger.

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