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Thread: Stativ VS Dynamic server requests

  1. #1
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    Stativ VS Dynamic server requests

    A web server's job is basically to accept requests from clients and send responses to those requests. A web server gets a URL, translates it to a filename (for static requests), and sends that file back over the internet from the local disk, or it translates it to a program name (for dynamic requests), executes it, and then sends the output of that program back over the internet to the requesting party.

    What is the difference between a static and a dynamic server request?

  2. #2
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    Google static vs dynamic server request
    vs = verses , which allows you to compare the 2 items.
    About 21,500,000 results (0.87 seconds)

  3. #3
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    vs == versus

    Static usually means it just have HTML files that it sends to the requester, with no actual programmatic processing on the server side (other than what the web server does).

    Dynamic usually means there is some additional processing done to generate some or all of the HTML output "on the fly", based on the request specifics, current database info, etc.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Train View Post
    Google static vs dynamic server request
    vs = verses , which allows you to compare the 2 items.
    About 21,500,000 results (0.87 seconds)
    I know there is Google. I rather prefer to ask a human.
    Thank you.

  5. #5
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    Hi,

    When a Web page is requested , the server where the page is stored returns the HTML document to the user's computer and the browser displays it. On a static Web page, this is all that happens. The user may interact with the document through clicking available links, or a small program (an applet) may be activated, but the document has no capacity to return information that is not pre-formatted.

    On a dynamic Web page, the user can make requests (often through a form) for data contained in a database on the server that will be assembled on the fly according to what is requested.

    Thanks.
    Krishna Agola

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by krishna.agola View Post
    Hi,

    When a Web page is requested , the server where the page is stored returns the HTML document to the user's computer and the browser displays it. On a static Web page, this is all that happens. The user may interact with the document through clicking available links, or a small program (an applet) may be activated, but the document has no capacity to return information that is not pre-formatted.

    On a dynamic Web page, the user can make requests (often through a form) for data contained in a database on the server that will be assembled on the fly according to what is requested.

    Thanks.
    Krishna Agola
    Thanks!

  7. #7
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    Each time a DHCP client boots, it sends out a DHCP discover message. All DHCP servers answer (in practice only one is set to do this at Fermilab; in the future possibly a second will be added for redundancy) with an offer message that includes an address which is available to the client.

    The client machine typically repeats the discover message several times to make sure it hears from all the servers, then eventually chooses the "best" server, where what is "best" is up to the client. It may mean that the addresses the DHCP server has available offer the longest lease time. Or the client might prefer a server that provides WINS servers over one that doesn't (the WINS servers keep track of all the clients' and servers' latest dynamic IP addresses).

    The currently active DHCP server is configured by hand to handle and reserve IP addresses and the IP configuration information that goes with them. Addresses are made available in an order that permits a client to have the best chance of getting back the same address it was using most recently. To this end, the DHCP server offers its least recently used address to a new client.

    Once the client chooses a DHCP server, it "officially" requests the IP address and configuration information. In addition to this, it receives a lease time for the address. This lease time is not absolute. As long as it is running, the client machine requests renewal of the lease. This is invisible to the user, although there is a mechanism for the user to release the address early ( ipconfig/release from the command prompt).

    Client machines in the NT domain typically access multiple file servers, print servers, and so on. The clients as well as the servers may change their IP addresses. Via the WINS servers, this is transparent to the user.

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