dcsimg
www.webdeveloper.com
Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Which hosting provider best?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    108

    Question Which hosting provider best?

    Hi,


    Which web hosting provider is best for domain registration and website hosting. Please share your suggestions with us!!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    11
    It depends on your needs. Are you small and looking for shared hosting, or big and looking for a dedicated server? Do you need a fully managed server or are you going to manage the server yourself (not a good idea unless that's what you do for a living in which case you wouldn't be asking the question). Do you need a host who will set you up with a CDN, or will you do that yourself? There's a 1001 questions I could ask…

    One suggestion though – never let your host register your domain (it gives them too much power over you and they can hold your domain hostage if there's a dispute). Register it yourself.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    6
    Hello,
    New to this forum, really new to the whole web thing.

    Mr. Jay5r, how do you register your domain yourself?
    thanx

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    81
    When choosing for a domain name registrar, find one that includes WHOIS privacy at no additional cost. Shared hosting will usually charge more for this if you register your domain with them as well, not worth it. WHOis privacy, protects your contact info and keeps it from displaying when someone searches who owns the domain. There's other things to consider, but it all depends on your needs.

    Google Free WHOIS privacy Domain Registrars:
    domain registrars free whois privacy

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    6
    Thank you Zorg. Good info. I will definitively look into that?

    Are you a freelance web developer?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    81
    No problem, bolelove, and yes I am freelance at this time.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    6
    The reason I am asking is 1-I too am venturing into Freelance WD 2-Like you I live in Southern Cali.
    So question that drew me to this forum is... Do you need a business license to be a freelance WD?

    thanx

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    81
    In california and depending on where in Cali you live, you do need a business license.
    This all is depending on:
    • what city/county you live, you file at your local city hall and/or at your county. Check out your county's website.
    • Also to consider, are you using your own name as the business name or do you have a business name chosen? (DBA - Doing Business As)
    • Are you Incorporating or sole proprietor?
    • Work from home or office space?
    • If you only do additional jobs here and there to supplement your income, you can file 1099's in your income taxes without a license, but if it's your main source of income then yes business license is required.


    Visit your local government website to find out more.

    Here is an article that might help explain more:
    https://webdesign.tutsplus.com/artic...webdesign-1987

    Here is an article from US Small Buisness Administration:
    https://www.sba.gov/blogs/starting-f...tual-paperwork

    FYI: I'm not a lawyer, so this isn't legal advice.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    6
    Good info Zorg. I have done some of what you mentioned and I will follow the other steps too, good idea.

    thank you very much for the resource. Very practical.

    I have heard Freelance WD(FWD) charge a fee for creating a website and an ongoing monthly fee for maintaining that same website. What are your thoughts on that and your take on the secret on how to charge?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    81

    You can do it!

    First off, let me welcome you to the forum, Welcome, bolelove! Now.. to answer your question... the following is my view, no way defined in stone.

    Some people charge by the hour others charge per project, I personally usually charge by project - depending on the time it will take to complete, it's just a headache to have to explain each hour of work to someone unfamiliar with what you do. It's too easy for things to turn to complaints "why this/that" it's just not worth it - you're now stuck trying to put out fires instead of getting paid for your work. You still should itemize your invoice with each tasks done/delivered. It's easier to quote the project as a flat rate ahead of time, rather than to go back to a client with an invoice with unexpected hourly fees.

    Website maintenance or updates is usually optional or an upsell, which can be a monthly fee for those that need lots of regular changes/updates monthly. Also, here you can charge an hourly fee for emergency or less frequent changes/updates. It's all about the time it will take for you to complete a task/project. How much is your time worth, how much do you want to make in a month and what amount of time do you want to spend working on a given project or past projects, and still have time to do maintenance? Divide that up and seriously think about it if you will have that time, as a solo dev, to give and also be fair to all your clients on your maintenance plan, think now and the future, when hopefully down the road - you will have lots of clients. You need free time too, so define your hours of operation. Be clear in explaining to a potential client, the differences between revisions, maintenance and updates. Maintenance is not reworking a website, updates is not adding new features. Adding new images, changing a banner, updating content? Ok thats cool. Rewriting code or reformatting a page. Nope, that's extra. At least that's me.

    Some advice: When meeting with a potential client, it's a two way interview, a client is seeing if you're the person for the job, and you're learning if the client is going to be worth dealing with for the duration of the project. Personality, expectations and character all come into play. Most the time potential clients have a vision but, have unrealistic expectations, don't know what they want or how to get it. Its up to you to give yourself value, to convince the potential client that you can help solve their problem, be honest about what you know, but never say you don't know, it's always "I will find out that information for you get back to you". You need to make sure that the potential client understands what you do and what you can do for them.

    Also, this is important (guilty of this myself); Never quote the project on the first meeting, unexpected things or purchases can come up, like having to learn something new, stock image costs, etc... So plan to have more than one meeting. The first meeting is all about the client, find out everything about the project. What is it for, what are the expectations, do they have a budget or just looking, etc. Set up the next meeting, ask if you're the first dev they met, if so encourage them to meet other developers, this way they get an idea of what others charge. Let the other devs burst the bubble they may have in their head. Second meeting is all about you; this is where you will present a proposal with solutions to their problems along with the itemized quote. This gives you the time to prepare, research and to really break down the project and see how it would be like working with this client.
    • How many revisions you will provide a client, what about if they need more? This is expected, they might not like the font-face or the menu bar size - is not how they envisioned. Put a limit on this, after the limit, add to invoice any additional revisions.
    • What do you charge if a client changes their mind, halfway in the project and now wants a complete re-do or is it included in the quote? If it's a simple site, a re-do may be no big deal but a more complex site... geesh!
    • What about editing images they provide or stock image costs? Will you provide the service or outsource?
    • When should they deliver all content needed to complete the site? Deadlines! You don't want to wait months to get paid on a project you completed already, just cuz they haven't sent the word doc with their homepage info.
    • What if you're half way deep in the project and they just decide to go with someone else, because their cousin will do it for cheap? Always get a non-refundable deposit before writing any piece of code!
    • Who is uploading the completed site to their hosting provider, will you need to register their domain and get them hosting too? Hopefully you will handle this, because they may unknowingly get a hosting provider with the wrong server configuration for the website you delivered.
    • What about new features they want later down the road, once the site is delivered, like adding a mailing list, social media or a widget?

    Now, after each meeting, it is helpful and courteous to send an email to the potential client, summarizing the meeting's notes and be clear of what is expected from you and them, accountability and documentation. You don't want later down the road, to get into a "he said she said" situation and end up losing a client, regardless of who was right - you both lose. To me these things are more important than what to charge. Customer service, knowing your limitations, strengths and giving value to your time. If you get the project, Great! Get a non-refundable deposit upfront, keep your promises and build a working relationship with your new client.

    Hope this helps, you can do this! keep it up and wish you the best.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    6

    Much Thanx

    Mr. Zorg, I am speechless. This is a million dollar consultation. I appreciate you taking the time to give me such a detailed answer. Thank you very much.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    81
    Glad to help, bolelove!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
HTML5 Development Center



Recent Articles