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Thread: Why are people afraid to use CSS?

  1. #1
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    Why are people afraid to use CSS?

    Simple question; What's the answer? I have a few opinions of my own, but, you know me, I want to know what everyone else has to say about it.
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  2. #2
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    Perhaps simply because they're afraid to do something different than what they're used to, or have heard misleading myths and whatnot. But once they realize the benefits and ease of use comes along with CSS, they realize they should've switched a long time ago.
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  3. #3
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    i wasn't afraid - i was just lazy. i think many people just don't want to have to learn another language, plain and simple.
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  4. #4
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    Originally posted by fredmv
    Perhaps simply because they're afraid to do something different than what they're used to, or have heard misleading myths and whatnot.
    You mean like Phlash over at BritBox. lol
    Last edited by PhillMc; 08-21-2004 at 05:58 PM.
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  5. #5
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    I think peoples reluctance to make use of css is the belief that it is another language, rater than the anex to html that it actualy is.
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  6. #6
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    It baffles me, also. Considering its one of the easiest technologies to gain a working knowledge of.

    Through conversation with business owners, I have been told that they simply dont have to learn CSS. They have trouble keeping up with business as it is. And lets face it, the big guys dont care whether the net is full of non-standard Web Pages -- they want money!

    Regards.
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  7. #7
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    Yeah, CSS is by far the easiest language to learn. It's one of those languages where you can learn everything you need to know about it in less than a day, but you continue to learn different techniques for many-a-day afterwards.

    Like buntine said, most web developers nowadays don't care about CSS and web standards. Sadly, these are the people getting paid thousands of dollars a site.
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  8. #8
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    (Damn- this is relevant! Belongs in the CSS forum IMNSHO...)

    Well, why would they care? As soon as the page is launched, it's no longer their concern. Currently, their are no repurcussions of writing inaccessible, non-standard compliant pages, and this way they don't have to worry about learning new techniques, or the ever-fearsome thing called "change." However, if not meeting the requirements of 508 and WAI were to become punishable by law, this'd be another story. Speaking of which, has anyone heard of when/ if this is going to occur?
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  9. #9
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    I've been doing this kinda stuf for about 11 months now. It was just after my first week that I found out html was not a static "one size fits all" kinda thing. I found this 'ere html 3.2 thing and though: "bummer man, it expands". So I finally learned all the tags for 3.2 and what they did. So a few weeks more after that, I find 4.0 and 4.01. So again I get learning that. Then I find this DTD thing. I simply assume that it is merely for stating which version of html you are using and that was that (in the sense of version number not frameset strict and transitional). I soon realise this is not the case and have my first encounter with the W3C when I go to find what it actually is for.

    My first encounter with the W3C was a far from pleasant one too. Previously having next to no experience with computers I had no idea what most of their terminology meant.I'd start with one page I'm supposed to be reading, then have to go off to another page to find the meaning of some acronym they used whilst describing an aspect of what I was trying to learn about. Trouble is though that the page i'm going to to get an explanation of terminology on the first page also had terminology that needed explanation on another page. So on average I'd spend 80% of my time rumaging around the site looking for explanations of what the hell they were saying and 20% of my time actually getting close to learning something.

    Then after that came Javascript. I spent a while trying to learn it, I managed to get some of the bare minimum basics down, but decided not to waste my time learning it much more than that because it can so easily be disabled.

    Then came the web standards. I found my pages didn't work in other browsers. I realised that the html I'd been learning from some sites was this "proprietary code". An absurd notion if ever there was one I though at the time (and most certainly still do), so once again off I go trying to learn what is good code and what is bad code (hello again W3C and the inevitable terminology wrestling championship that comes with it).

    As you might imagine, after all that I got the distinct impression I was chasing ghosts. At every step there was always something more to learn. Every time you thought you'd got something right, you find you've only uncovered another problem that you have to learn more to fix.

    I knew I still had CSS to go if I was to move away from tabular layouts, but loathed the thought of having to learn it because I got the distinct impression that as soon as I would start to get the swing of it, I'd have to learn yet another language to supplement it. The fact that it made my sites look pretty much the same on all browsers though spurred me on and gave me the drive I needed and thankfully I didn't need to learn another language to supplement CSS.

    I'm on to php now (which I've been putting of fow quite some time now) and already having to look at bits apache and wondering what the hell I'm looking at.

    As you've probably guessed by now it's that sense of the more you learn - the less you know that had the strongest potential to put me off. But I still jumped on CSS pretty much as soon as I found it just because of the cross browser thing and I had a feeling of motivation at the time.

    CSS was by far the easiest to learn and for its simplicity has a massive impact. If anything it was the rest of the web development process that put me off learning CSS rather than CSS its self.
    I'm thuper, thanks for asking.

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  10. #10
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    moved to css forum due to relativity, value in that forum, and general on-topic potential.
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  11. #11
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    Nice post.
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  12. #12
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    Originally posted by omega
    (Damn- this is relevant! Belongs in the CSS forum IMNSHO...)
    Originally posted by rhsunderground
    moved to css forum due to relativity, value in that forum, and general on-topic potential.
    *Feels special*
    Originally posted by rhsunderground
    general on-topic potential.
    Can't have that, now can we? But I'ma shush up now, I'm hurting that potential on-topicness...
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  13. #13
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    Originally posted by omega
    *Feels special*
    ... because his post count now increases ...

    I like your post, and similar thing has gone over on my end way back when I first learned. Although I'm still a proprietary guy, and unfortunately care less now than I have before ...

    I've moved between many languages as you have, except of course I started it all with application programming (the reason I'm the big proprietary guy ... because web programming on VB is IE-only, and doesn't cause problems at all).

    Although I beg to disagree that many people who use tables for layout, and depreciated HTML tags don't switch because they don't know of CSS or are too afraid. I think it is frankly a world where they see the results, and see it work for them, and then don't want to change because one doesn't find it necessary. ... If only people even learned form the garden ...
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  14. #14
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    Originally posted by Daniel T
    Yeah, CSS is by far the easiest language to learn. It's one of those languages where you can learn everything you need to know about it in less than a day, but you continue to learn different techniques for many-a-day afterwards.
    yea, that's how it was for me

    i have been doing a little web design here and there. I started freshmen year in a class that taught a little html for part of it (didnt pay much attention to that but rather learned on my own from the web :P) i read a lot on html then but nothing else. I didnt have anyone showing me anything as i knew more then the teacher :P i didnt find out about css till about a month ago or so when i asked a friend from the UK how i could make two links appear differently on the same page (something html just could not do >.< :P) i then learned of the STYLE="" stuff for the links and decided i might as well learn it all :P so for me the real reason of not learning it was a lack of knowing it was there. I plan on learning php next (next summer because college will be starting soon). ok, too long of a post :P
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  15. #15
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    People are afraid to use CSS becuase it requires work! The industry developed several products to make the creation of web pages easy: Dreamweaver,Frontpage,Visual Studio...
    People got very use to the applications developing the code for them. What this did was in fact, produce a massive amount of "web designers" that don't know CSS or HTML. So, it's not necessarily people afraid to use CSS, it's businesses that thrive off of the misconception that "Rita Receptionist" can create and manage the company website using Frontpage because it does the coding for you. (I didn't say it did it well )
    Last edited by crh3675; 08-23-2004 at 09:22 AM.
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