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Thread: What is loose.dtd and strict.dtd?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    What is loose.dtd and strict.dtd?

    Whenever I use Dreamweaver and start a HTML page from scratch, it starts the code off by putting the following:

    <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"
    "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">

    What is this?
    Having this seems to screw up the code and it simply doesn't behave as it should be.

    I've also seen other posting here wher eyou guys use strict.dtd.
    What's this>

    What should I be using?

    Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks.


    Jam

  2. #2
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    This is the HTML 4.01 Transitional DTD, which includes
    presentation attributes and elements that W3C expects to phase out
    as support for style sheets matures. Authors should use the Strict
    DTD when possible, but may use the Transitional DTD when support
    for presentation attribute and elements is required.

    HTML 4 includes mechanisms for style sheets, scripting,
    embedding objects, improved support for right to left and mixed
    direction text, and enhancements to forms for improved
    accessibility for people with disabilities.
    Document Type Definition. An SGML document type definition is a specific description of a markup language. This description is written as a plain text file, often with the filename extension .dtd. The HyperText Markup Language (HTML) has its own Document Type Definition file, often called html.dtd.
    A DTD, or document type definition, is a collection of XML markup declarations that, as a collection, defines the legal structure, elements, and attributes that are available for use in a document that complies to the DTD.

  3. #3
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    HTML 3.2 came out early in 1999 and is a description of how graphical browsers worked at the time. And to this day, if you write a page in HTML 3.2 it will look pretty much the same on all graphical browsers. The prolem is that it's likely to fail on a non-graphical browser such a Braille or audio browser.

    HTML 4.01 came out late in 1999 and is a description of how browsers should behave. For the most part it is 3.2 stripped of most of the stuff concerning presentation. In 3.2 you might use the FONT element to set off some text as ig and red. Sighted users can tell that the text is a heading but nit the unsighted ones. In HTML 4.01 there is no FONT element so you mark the text as, say, H2 and thes use style sheets to make all H2 elements big and red. HTML 4.01 is described by the HTML Strict and HTML Frameset DTDs.

    But being prescriptive, HTML 4.01 was ahead of the browsers. We once had to worry about browsers that didn't support stlye sheets so to cover the transitional period between 3.2 and 4.01 browsers the W3C also gave us 4.01 Transitional. It's simple a combination of all of 3.2 and 4.01. The idea is start with a proper 4.01 page and then add FONT elements and such to cover non-graphical browsers. The problem is that you can, and web authors frequently do, use it to produce web pages that neither work consistently across graphical browsers nor work on all kinds of browsers.

    And the time of transition being long over, there is now no reason to be using the transitional DTD. Use HTML 4.01 Strict.
    Last edited by Charles; 10-03-2004 at 06:12 PM.
    “The power of the Web is in its universality. Access by everyone regardless of disability is an essential aspect.”
    —Tim Berners-Lee, W3C Director and inventor of the World Wide Web

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