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Thread: Bachelor's Degree?

  1. #1
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    Bachelor's Degree?

    In order to get a job as a web developer do you have to have a degree?

  2. #2
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    Re: Bachelor's Degree?

    Originally posted by newbiewebdev
    In order to get a job as a web developer do you have to have a degree?
    Have to? Perhaps not. But a liberal arts education will make you a better one and will make you better able to recover if your carrer in web development fails.

    Where I live you can't swing a cat without hitting an out of work web developer but auto mechanics, day laborers and plumbers are in high demand. You might want to find something like that, something useful to society to spend your life doing.
    “The power of the Web is in its universality. Access by everyone regardless of disability is an essential aspect.”
    —Tim Berners-Lee, W3C Director and inventor of the World Wide Web

  3. #3
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    No, you don't need a degree, though depending on what aspect of web development you are interested in, it certainly may help. If you want to do backend development, a degree in computer science would likely help you get the job. If you prefer design, perhaps a Bachelor or Fine Arts or something similar.

    However, a degree isn't a requirement. In this industry, experience is often better...

  4. #4
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    Yah I was wondering the same question.

    Anyways now that I know this.

    I have a question..

    So I want to be a web developer. Well I don't want to spend 2 years of my life going to school for it if it isn't going to pay me well.

    I want to do something that people need badly. HTML, people are starting to learn this stuff quick. I want to get paid good while working with computers. What kind of job do you think would pay good and people need badly. Involving computers. Not including building them or fixing them. I am talking about developing things like, Code, Designing, Flash. Stuff like that.

  5. #5
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    From what I've seen lately, skilled Java developers (not JavaScript) are among the most in-demand people in the IT business sector.
    "Please give us a simple answer, so that we don't have to think, because if we think, we might find answers that don't fit the way we want the world to be."
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  6. #6
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    Cross browser code languages - Java, C++ or system specific - Delphi, Python, Cocoa.

  7. #7
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    yeh im learnin java right now

  8. #8
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    is java hard to learn?

  9. #9
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    There are a number of reasons why having an IT related degree in the IT field is better than not. The most important reason to have a degree is that is gives you a foundation in computer science that most "untrained" developers do not have. Much of this may seem irrelevant to many developers. This is a misconception, however. A developer with some computer science background understands issues like threading inside and out - one of the most important concepts to learn in high capacity systems development - regardless of whether it is threading in C++, Java, etc. This developer already knows about issues like race conditions, deadlocks, etc.

    These same developers do the math when it comes down to high traffic database systems which boil down to how to best handle data over a 64 bit bus at 66-133Mhz. In cases like this, knowing that your result sets returns 100 rows X 10 bytes per field X ten fields (for example) and will be called an average of three times per page request being hit by roughly 100 uses simultaneously makes all the difference.

    That's just of trivial example and by no means does this infer that uneducated developers can't teach themselves this info. In my experience, however, developers without degrees tend to have strong domain knowledge (php, java, etc.) while degreed developers have strong knowledge across the board regardless of implementation.

    What you need to ask yourself is what you want to be, a Web Developer or an Engineer. It is far easier for an engineer to do Web development than it is for a Web developer to do engineering. It also depends on what you want to do. If you want to make Web sites, then you probably don't need much computer science. Web sites are not computationally taxing. If you want to make more robust Web applications or Web presentation tiers in conjunction with enterprise applications, you may want to think about some college. You don't even need MIT, just get the core comp sci stuff down and you will have a deeper understanding of the why's and how's of every other facet of Information Technology. Not to mention that building multi-tier applications utilizing enterprise design patterns is way more fun.

  10. #10
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    Also, let me clear up a common misconception. HTML is almost never mentioned as a required skill for a web developer. It is assumed that you have pretty close to expert skills with that.

    Commercial web developers use server-side languages to develop database backed dynamic sites.

    Database skills are far and away the most important, and the least taught in college.

    A degree will give you a better shot at landing a good job, and during your years of schooling, you will get a better idea of what this is all about and have a much broader idea of what types of careers are out there that pique your interest. With HTML and JavaScript as your primary computer skills, you aren't likely to land a very good job. With Oracle, DB2, MS SQL, Java, .Net and C++ skills, people are going to be interested in interviewing you.

    All things being equal, most people will hire the person with the degree.

  11. #11
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    That is some very useful information right there guys, and or girls.

    Let me ask you this though.

    let me give you the whole story.

    I am not doing good in school right now. Infact I am 17 and am "SUPPOSED" to Graduate in 2006, but since I am not doing so good. I will Probably graduate in 2008 or 2009.

    You are probably thinking I am a complete and total idiot, but before you start judging me based on school, and text books let me ask you this.

    Is it at all possible to get into a college with a GED to get my Bachelors Degree.

    I am in a tough position. See I live in Michigan. Michigan Sucks people. I hate this state. You don't even understand. I myself think it is one of the top 10 worst states to live in. So a couple of friends and I want to leave. My friend has rich family in Colorado that he has being keeping in contact with, and they gave the ok to move out there with them for awhile until we get jobs and enough money for use to support or selfs with our own small apartment.

    This would require me to quit school here in Michigan. I would go back to school in Colorado, but I don't think it is possible since my mother or father will not be there to sign papers and all that non-sense.

    So, I got the idea of getting a GED. Along with my friend I am going with.

  12. #12
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    You don't need a high school diploma to get into college. Also, if you go to a community college you probably won't have to take SAT's. But if you have problems in English or Math you will likely have to take remedial courses. These are often non-credit courses. In other words it could take you more then 4 years to get a degree.

    On top of everything else, it looks better if you have a high school diploma then a GED. For some people, they see GED and think, "this person can't stick with things. How can I expect him to meet his obligations?"

    As far as getting a job, you either need to know technology that just came out, have 3 or more years experience as a web developer, or have a BS degree in Computer Science. Some companies will accept a BS degree in anything but the majority I've seen want Computer Science.
    Last edited by baseiber; 12-30-2004 at 09:26 AM.

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