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Thread: Computer does not boot up

  1. #1
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    Computer does not boot up

    Problem: When I start the computer, the fans come on and the green LED light also comes on, but it doesn't beep. Nor does it seem like the hard drive whirls. The monitor doesn't even come out of stand-by mode.
    Last time it was on, the computer froze(Just playing the game scrabble). I did a cold boot (pressed the power button for more than 4 seconds) and it never came back on. About a week earlier the computer started freezing like this from time to time. Each time the computer froze, I would do a cold boot. When I took the hard drive out and plugged it into my good computer, it would boot up with the 'Safe Mode' prompt. When I would select 'Start in Safe Mode', it would just reboot. I have reformatted the hard drive and now I can use it as the primary in my good computer, but when I put it back into the bad computer it still does not boot up. I've been all over the Compaq troubleshooting website (which is quite extensive) but to no avail. I have also jetted through this forum and heard something about reseting the CMOS. But as I'm unfamiliar with this I won't try it just yet.
    At first I thought it might be the power supply, but then why do the fans come on and also the LED light? The only things I can think of it being is either the motherboard/CPU, or the RAM. I'm going to replace the RAM tonight and if it still doesn't work that leads me to believe it's the mother/CPU?
    If the video card crapped out, would it cause symptoms like these?

    Computer stats: Compaq Presario 6410NX
    AMD Athlon XP 2000+ 1.67Mhz (AX2000DMT3C Model 10 w/256K cache)
    VIA KM266
    FIC AM37(motherboard)
    1x256MB DDR PC2100
    60GB Samsung ATA/100
    NVidia GeForce2 MMX 64MB
    Windows XP SP1
    Only thing added to this computer after factory was the video card (no problems with it before)

  2. #2
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    The only to do is what you're already doing. Swop in various components that you know work until the entire PC starts working again, the last thing you took out is the problem.

    Hope you figure it out.

  3. #3
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    Graphics card is another big suspect here.

    If you do this often then invest in a Post Code Reader - usually 5 on ebay, and worth their weight in gold.
    In a world without walls and fences - who needs Windows and Gates?! - Unknown Author
    "And there's Bill Gates, the...most...famous...man in the...ah...Microsoft." -- A TV commentator for the 2000 Olympics.


    Web Design Faq? | W3C | Validator | Accessibility testing | Speed up your PC | Wura | Box Model Research

  4. #4
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    Well, I disected my machine. I took everything apart and put it all back together, minus the video card. Low and behold! I was able to enter the BIOS. I was extremly happy to figure it out, but what perplexes me even more is when I tried to boot up WinXP it gave me the Stop: 0x000007B the inevitable BSOD!!! I'm not sure why the video card would have anything to do with the IDE controller or boot disk. I tried to do a Win Repair, but all I ended up doing was a total reinstall.
    My opinion is that maybe the video card got to hot, shorted out and messed up the IDE controller on the MB somehow. Does this sound possible?

  5. #5
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    Well it's unlikely that your graphics card over-heated, but it's possible. If the graphics card is quite old and the fan on it had dust caught it in slowing it down and your case has bad airflow then maybe. Even then it should have just caused your computer to crash rather then melt. But every now and then things just go wrong, nothing lives forever.

  6. #6
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    I'd say graphics cards are usually the problem - if you think of a standard graphics card in a standard case, there's no air flow over the cooler, since it usually runs from the bottom of the front to the top of the back, so all those fans and heatsinks are a waste of space unless they run over the top of the card so the warm air can rise...

    could be a boot sector virus too.
    http://www.acersupport.com/ess/artic...ticles/221.cfm
    In a world without walls and fences - who needs Windows and Gates?! - Unknown Author
    "And there's Bill Gates, the...most...famous...man in the...ah...Microsoft." -- A TV commentator for the 2000 Olympics.


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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveSW
    I'd say graphics cards are usually the problem - if you think of a standard graphics card in a standard case, there's no air flow over the cooler, since it usually runs from the bottom of the front to the top of the back, so all those fans and heatsinks are a waste of space unless they run over the top of the card so the warm air can rise...
    Not unless you get one like this like I just have. Takes air from inside the case, blows it over a monster heatsink and then out the back.

  8. #8
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    Yeah I have one of those teensy weensy shuttles and that's forever destroying graphics cards.
    In a world without walls and fences - who needs Windows and Gates?! - Unknown Author
    "And there's Bill Gates, the...most...famous...man in the...ah...Microsoft." -- A TV commentator for the 2000 Olympics.


    Web Design Faq? | W3C | Validator | Accessibility testing | Speed up your PC | Wura | Box Model Research

  9. #9
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    I know someone who has one of those, they run it without the case on and an 80mm fan outside it blowing air onto the graphics card.

  10. #10
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    I suppose I could cut a hole in the side and add a fan, but after you've paid that much for the case, you don't really want to go cutting it up!
    In a world without walls and fences - who needs Windows and Gates?! - Unknown Author
    "And there's Bill Gates, the...most...famous...man in the...ah...Microsoft." -- A TV commentator for the 2000 Olympics.


    Web Design Faq? | W3C | Validator | Accessibility testing | Speed up your PC | Wura | Box Model Research

  11. #11
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    One of your Ram chips fried, and get a bigger PSU.

  12. #12
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    But ... we already know that it was his graphics card.

  13. #13
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    No, my RAM chip did not fry. And how do you know I have to change my PSU? I never said that was the problem. It was a problem with the video card. Of course, now I'm not sure if it was heat. It still doesn't work, but it doesn't look like anything has melted. Does heat actually melt physical components on a board to which we can see it?

    The computer works fine now. After I took out the video card, which doesn't have a fan on it (only a heatsink), everything worked again. Of course, after I did a full reinstall of WinXP.

  14. #14
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    Yes, heat can melt stuff. A while ago I got foolish and started mesing around in BIOS overclocking my CPU. I must have gotten a little too frivalous with the voltages because upon booting up into windows my PC just turned off. When I turned it on again I smelt something burning, so I quickly turned it off. I left it for a long time and when I turned it on again I got nothing. Turns out that the motherboard was dead and I had to get it replaced, ack. I couldn't see any burn marks on it but something had definately fried.

    The moral of the story is, learn to overclock properly before you start tampering. Oh, and don't do drugs.

  15. #15
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    The other moral is: be content with that which thou hast!!!!
    In a world without walls and fences - who needs Windows and Gates?! - Unknown Author
    "And there's Bill Gates, the...most...famous...man in the...ah...Microsoft." -- A TV commentator for the 2000 Olympics.


    Web Design Faq? | W3C | Validator | Accessibility testing | Speed up your PC | Wura | Box Model Research

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