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Thread: Section 508 compliance issues

  1. #1
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    Section 508 compliance issues

    When I check my page for Section 508 compliance (using http://bobby.watchfire.com), I always get an error, though I'm not quite sure why. It says "Make sure there is a link to download accessible plug-ins." But I don't have anything on the page requiring plug-ins, and the only thing on the entire site they would need would be a PDF reader, and I have a link on every page to download Acrobat Reader. So why would it be telling me to put a link in? I suppose it could be just the result of having an automated check, but I just wanted to be sure I wasn't missing something before I dismissed the error. My site is http://www.cityofpoulsbo.com if anyone wants to help.
    Fell in love with his Keno waitress,
    They honeymooned in Memphis,
    They were married by the drive up window.
    Trailer parks, neon signs,
    And an empty box of Lucky Strikes,
    All used up on the dashboard of America.
    --All You Can Ever Learn Is What You Already Know (The Ataris)

  2. #2
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    Arrow Bobby/Watchfire?

    I would suggest you to avoid those weird messages of those automated testing tools, especially of Bobby/Watchfire.

    I made a quick check of your page, and I only found one accessibility issue, which is that the accesskey "4" has already been used. The same accesskey should not be used more than once.

    Also I found a markup error here:

    Code:
    <caption><a href="CityCouncil/calendar.asp?date=8/2005&amp;day=1&amp;size=small"><</a>-
    I found the character '<' while looking for '>'. The character '>' must appear before another '<'. If you actually want to use this character in the text portion of your document, then use the character entity reference "&lt;".

    If you need any further help, let me know.

  3. #3
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    Thanks, I can't believe I didn't notice that markup error. And I don't even know what happened with those access keys they were all wrong. They should be fixed now, though. Thank you!
    Fell in love with his Keno waitress,
    They honeymooned in Memphis,
    They were married by the drive up window.
    Trailer parks, neon signs,
    And an empty box of Lucky Strikes,
    All used up on the dashboard of America.
    --All You Can Ever Learn Is What You Already Know (The Ataris)

  4. #4
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    Arrow

    Two more issues you might would like to know:

    1. It is recommended (and common practice for HTML (not XHTML) documents) that text contained in a "style" element be enclosed in a comment (<!-- ... -->) for backward compatibility with pre HTML 3.2 browsers that do not support the "style" element. This prevents them from actually displaying the element's content. For example, use something like <style><!-- ... --></style>.

    2. It is recommended (and common practice for HTML (not XHTML) documents) that text contained in a "script" element be enclosed in a comment (<!-- ... -->) for backward compatibility with pre HTML 3.2 browsers that do not support the "script" element. This prevents them from actually displaying the element's content. For example, use something like <script><!-- ... --></script>. For maximum compatibility, it is recommended putting the script (especially longer scripts) in an external file and using the "src" attribute to specify the external file. However, this is not as important for HTML documents as it is for XHTML documents.

    By the way, your work is really cool!

  5. #5
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    1, 2. Okay. I guess I kind of knew that, but I never really realized that it was really important. I'll definitely fix that.

    By the way...thanks. I'm self taught mostly, which I guess explains why I'm having so many problems now that I'm learning about accessibility and standards compliance!
    Fell in love with his Keno waitress,
    They honeymooned in Memphis,
    They were married by the drive up window.
    Trailer parks, neon signs,
    And an empty box of Lucky Strikes,
    All used up on the dashboard of America.
    --All You Can Ever Learn Is What You Already Know (The Ataris)

  6. #6
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    Wow! I am impressed. By the way, do you know that our academy will be launched approx. on the 15 of October this year? Would you like to have a look? http://academy.webnauts.net

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Webnauts
    Two more issues you might would like to know:

    1. It is recommended (and common practice for HTML (not XHTML) documents) that text contained in a "style" element be enclosed in a comment (<!-- ... -->) for backward compatibility with pre HTML 3.2 browsers that do not support the "style" element. This prevents them from actually displaying the element's content. For example, use something like <style><!-- ... --></style>.

    2. It is recommended (and common practice for HTML (not XHTML) documents) that text contained in a "script" element be enclosed in a comment (<!-- ... -->) for backward compatibility with pre HTML 3.2 browsers that do not support the "script" element. This prevents them from actually displaying the element's content. For example, use something like <script><!-- ... --></script>. For maximum compatibility, it is recommended putting the script (especially longer scripts) in an external file and using the "src" attribute to specify the external file. However, this is not as important for HTML documents as it is for XHTML documents.

    By the way, your work is really cool!
    Both the STYLE element and the SCRIPT element are a part of HTML 3.2 ( http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html32#script ). You have to go all the way back to HTML 2.0 (1995) to find a browser that needs those comment marks. A few things to note about commenting out JavaScript, though:

    1) Commenting out the script works because the opening comment mark, "<!--", is defined in JavaScript as a "to the end of the line"comment. But the closing comment mark, "-->", is not. You need therefore to use <script type="text/javascript"><!-- \n ... // --></script>

    2) The end of the script is defined as the first occurance of the "ETAGO ('</') delimiters followed immediately by a name character [a-zA-Z] ... [so] that the element's end-tag (or that of an element in which it is nested) is recognized, while an error occurs if the ETAGO is invalid." Which is to say that you have to escape anything that looks like an end tag. document.write ('<h4>Foo and Bar<\/h4>')

    3) In SGML it is actually the "--" character sequence that toggles the comment so you have to be careful to not include it in the comment itself. Be careful to avoid the pre or post decriment.

    Or beter yet, give up on the commenting out already. It's 2005 after all.
    Last edited by Charles; 09-29-2005 at 02:06 PM.
    “The power of the Web is in its universality. Access by everyone regardless of disability is an essential aspect.”
    —Tim Berners-Lee, W3C Director and inventor of the World Wide Web

  8. #8
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    So you don't think commenting the scripts is at all necessary? Hm...interesting...
    Fell in love with his Keno waitress,
    They honeymooned in Memphis,
    They were married by the drive up window.
    Trailer parks, neon signs,
    And an empty box of Lucky Strikes,
    All used up on the dashboard of America.
    --All You Can Ever Learn Is What You Already Know (The Ataris)

  9. #9
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    How many people of the people that you know are using pre-1998 browsers?

    Of the people in the world who are still using pre-1998 browsers, how many deserve what they get?
    “The power of the Web is in its universality. Access by everyone regardless of disability is an essential aspect.”
    —Tim Berners-Lee, W3C Director and inventor of the World Wide Web

  10. #10
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    Well, I guess I don't know anyone using pre-1998 browsers. But there have to be some out there. I wouldn't want to leave them out in the cold, even if they "deserve what they get".
    Fell in love with his Keno waitress,
    They honeymooned in Memphis,
    They were married by the drive up window.
    Trailer parks, neon signs,
    And an empty box of Lucky Strikes,
    All used up on the dashboard of America.
    --All You Can Ever Learn Is What You Already Know (The Ataris)

  11. #11
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    They're not "out in the cold". Nothig worse than seeing your scripts and styles will happen to them. They'll still have access to the rest of your page.
    “The power of the Web is in its universality. Access by everyone regardless of disability is an essential aspect.”
    —Tim Berners-Lee, W3C Director and inventor of the World Wide Web

  12. #12
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    Great points Charles.

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