WebDeveloper.com �: Where Web Developers and Designers Learn How to Build Web Sites, Program in Java and JavaScript, and More!   
Web Developer Resource Directory WebDev Jobs
Animated GIFs
CSS
CSS Properties
Database
Design
Flash
HTML
HTML 4.01 Tags
JavaScript
.NET
PHP
Reference
Security
Site Management
Video
XML/RSS
WD Forums
 Client-Side
  Development

    HTML
    XML
    CSS
    Graphics
    JavaScript
    ASP
    Multimedia
    Web Video
    Accessibility
    Dreamweaver
    General
    Accessibility
    Dreamweaver
    Expression Web

    General

 Server-Side
  Development

    PHP
    Perl
    .NET
    Forum, Blog, Wiki & CMS
    SQL
    Java
    Others

 Site Management
    Domain Names
    Search Engines
    Website Reviews

 Web Development
  Business Issues

    Business Matters

 Etc.
    The Coffee Lounge
    Computer Issues
    Feedback




Software Review:Astound Dynamite

By Scott Clark DHTML and Java: the Dynamite Connection As you build your project, you are able to choose the resolution you are creating for. Although this would be okay if everyone had the same screen resolution, everyone doesn't, so if you choose the default 640X480 resolution for your pages, you'll be left with a large black rectangle on the right side of the screen if you're viewing the page at 800X600 or higher. A far better solution would be to check for the viewer's resolution and write the page accordingly. Perhaps next release? Another thing I wasn't impressed with is that fact that Dynamite always, repeat, always uses a Java applet called "JumpApplet" for some of its functionality. I'm sure I'm not alone when I say that I'd prefer my DHTML pages to not rely on Java in order to work. And this isn't a teeny applet; it weighs in at a hefty 69K! Also, it creates separate JavaScript files which are referenced from the page(s), so if you want to check out the JavaScript source you'll have to open it with a text editor. This does make the page load faster, however, once that required Java applet is downloaded.
Dynamite's Toolbar
Figure 1: Dynamite's Toolbar provides instant access many functions.
On to the good stuff. Generally the first thing most of us will want to do is create some flashy, enticing entry page for our Web site using Dynamic HTML. Something that downloads fast, looks great, and uses DHTML for the majority of its effects. We realize that if we really get into the groove, we can create these effects from scratch by hand coding them, but we want to do it using a drag-and-drop tool to save time, right? Dynamite provides the developer with a fairly simple approach to create DHTML animations. First, assuming that you already have the program running and open, you click on either the animation button or the image button from the toolbar on the left (See figure 1).


HTML5 Development Center


Recent Articles