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How to Write a Successful Press Release (Part 2)

A press release is the normal way of communicating with most of your press contacts.

The advantage of a press release is that it can be sorted, filed, retrieved, and used directly by a publication. It can even be saved in someone's Inbox. On its own, however, a press release won't build the relationship you want. You want the writer to think of you and email you when he needs information. A regular series of press releases will help. A good point to note though is that this is not entirely crucial. If you merely want to have press releases for publications to download or obtain directly from you, then this ‘relationship’ is not quite as important. Sure, you want to attract the publications back to your releases, but as you are not working with individuals as such, this is not so important. The first step is to build a list of publications. While you certainly want to include the majority of computer orientated and technical sites/magazines, unless you are marketing a horizontal site or a service appealing only to sophisticated users, you want to concentrate on the specific sites covering your vertical market. Unless you develop applications, the majority of people who can use your product don't read HotWired. Generally speaking, the sites and publications you want are oriented toward your target ‘customer’ base, whether they are stamp collectors, Star Trek fans or fans of the Royal Family. After searching the 'Net, subscribe to any e-mail publications that you can find which you feel could be useful in promoting your site or service.


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