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How to Write a Successful Press Release (Part 3)

As a writer and webmaster I recieve hundreds of "professional" press releases from large organizations. There are very few hard rules about format, so don't feel that you have to copy any format exactly; do what works. This said, it is wise to keep all of your own releases to a specific format, whether it's a strict one or not. This way, the publications who are interested in your releases feel familiar with your releases and can associate you with them. Moving onto the creation of the press release, A press release generally starts with a release date. This is not always required, but if you do not want to mark the release with a date then at least put something similar to FOR IMMINENT RELEASE for example. The usual first line is: FOR RELEASE 15 MARCH 1998 This can sometimes create a useful sense of urgency in the remote publication. They may feel compelled to publish the information on the exact date (or close to it) and endeavour to get your story out on time. If they see this release at a much later date however, then this may also have a negative effect. Either way, you should make your own decision. Next comes contact information. With ‘traditional’ press releases, this is a name (PR Manager) and a phone number. With the advent of the World Wide Web, a URL or email address will do just as well, indeed an email address is usually required by many publications, as they would like to check up on your news. Here is an example:


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