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Software Review: Cognicity AudioKey 1.0 (Part 3)

I decided to put AudioKey through a kind of "torture test". I used a music file I was very familiar with, since I performed on it, recorded it, and mixed it myself, and which is a particularly good test file because it has a number of silences in it. First, I took the original stereo WAV file, encoded a message in it, and decoded it. No problem there. Then I edited the WAV file in Sound Forge XP, adding a few seconds of silence to the beginning, chopping some time off the end, and changing the overall volume of the song. The message still decoded fine. Now I decided to get serious. First I tried compressing it to RealAudio. AudioKey was able to extract the message in a single operation...still no challenge. Aha, said I...everybody's always complaining about MP3 being the preferred format of music pirates, and everyone knows it's a "lossy" compression scheme. So, using a couple of audio tools I happened to have laying around on the disk, I first converted the file to 128 Kbps MP3 (which took it from a 15.75 MB file to just 1.5 MB) and then back to WAV format.


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