WebDeveloper.com �: Where Web Developers and Designers Learn How to Build Web Sites, Program in Java and JavaScript, and More!   
Web Developer Resource Directory WebDev Jobs
Animated GIFs
CSS
CSS Properties
Database
Design
Flash
HTML
HTML 4.01 Tags
JavaScript
.NET
PHP
Reference
Security
Site Management
Video
XML/RSS
WD Forums
 Client-Side
  Development

    HTML
    XML
    CSS
    Graphics
    JavaScript
    ASP
    Multimedia
    Web Video
    Accessibility
    Dreamweaver
    General
    Accessibility
    Dreamweaver
    Expression Web

    General

 Server-Side
  Development

    PHP
    Perl
    .NET
    Forum, Blog, Wiki & CMS
    SQL
    Java
    Others

 Site Management
    Domain Names
    Search Engines
    Website Reviews

 Web Development
  Business Issues

    Business Matters

 Etc.
    The Coffee Lounge
    Computer Issues
    Feedback




Hints of XML Future in Forthcoming Browsers Part 2

By Nate Zelnick An Analysis of the Biggies
<XML:namespace prefix="empty"/>
Notice that this is an empty XML tag that closes itself. Now IE has a bag into which it can put the XML elements when it parses it. To identify the elements that should go into that bag, add the prefix that was designed for it to the elements using the following syntax:
Namespace prefix: element name
The simple CUSTOMER object we used above, placed in a document, now looks like this:
 <HTML> <HEAD> <XML:namespace prefix="empty"/> </HEAD> <BODY> <empty:customer> <empty:name>Joe Customer</empty:name> <empty:company>Acme Consolidated Industries Ltd.</empty:company> <empty:street>123 Main Street</empty:street> <empty:city>Anytown</empty:city> <empty:state>PA</empty:state> </empty:customer> </BODY> <HTML> 
By creating a generic presentation for the BODY object (that holds all visible parts of a document) you can make the content of XML elements visible in the browser. All elements will show up as inline--meaning they do not sit on their own lines--by default.


HTML5 Development Center


Recent Articles